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Monthly Archives: January 2010

Me vs Mt. Maquíling: 0-2

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Yesterday, Arnaldo, I, and two of our officemates had a fun climb in Mt. Maquíling (using the famous and safer University of the Philippines Los Baños trail). It was my second try to scale its heights. My first one two years ago was a failure. And so was yesterday’s hike; we miscalculated the trip it would take us to Peak Two, the mountain’s highest point.

Adding insult to injury, all the photos I took of our climb were accidentally deleted! It still puzzles me up to now how it happened (I haven’t recovered yet from the shock). Fortunately, Arnaldo took his camera along. But those photos I took (including two short videos in the spectacular boiling Mud Springs) were numerous and more defined. I’m so frustrated I could’t even write further. =(

Photographs are memories, dammit…

An important lesson I’d like to share: NEVER DELETE UNWANTED PHOTOS FROM YOUR DIGITAL CAMERA. Start deleting only when they are all uploaded into your PCs.

Hit it baby, one more time: DAMMIT!

Photo taken last 2008 in Mt. Maquíling's Sto. Tomás trail (Batangas).

I’ll blog about this second Maquíling hike once I get the photos from Arnaldo. And once I have recovered from sheer disappointment. =(

United Philippine Tomatoes!

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Tomatoes! (01/22/2010)

Urbanities?

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Ayala Avenue, Macati City (01/04/2010)

Ananias Diokno, taaleño revolucionario

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Today is the birth anniversary of Ananias Diokno, one of the greatest Filipino soldiers of all time.

Below is a brief biographical sketch of the taaleño revolucionario written by Carmencita H. Acosta (from the 1965 book Eminent Filipinos which was published by the National Historical Commission, a precursor of today’s National Historical Institute).

ANANIAS DIOKNO
(1860-1922)

The only Tagalog general to lead a full-scale military expedition to the Visayas against the Spaniards was General Ananias Diokno. He was also among the very few who, in the twilight period of the War of Independence, bravely undertook guerrilla warfare against the Americans.

General Diokno, born on January 22, 1860, in Taal, Batangas, to Ángel Diokno and Ándrea Noblejas, began his military career as Secretary of War in the departmental government of Batangas. After distinguishing himself in several battles in the Batangas-Laguna-Tayabas zone, he was commissioned to lead an expedition to the Visayas to attack the Spanish stronghold there and to forge unity between the Visayan rebel forces and the Central Revolutionary Government of Emilio Aguinaldo.

Diokno, therefore, organized the Maluya Battalion and sailed in September, 1898, first to Mindoro, then to Marinduque, where he reorganized his battalion; then proceeded to Camarines and places to the south. He established the local revolutionary governments in Buriás, Sorsogón, and Romblón where he supervised the election of local officials.

At Navas, Aclán, he victoriously laid siege to the Spanish stronghold. Diokno’s army then proceeded to Calibo and afterwards to Cápiz and in both places defeated the Spaniards. In a short while, the whole of Cápiz was completely liberated from Spanish rule.

Aguinaldo, upon recommendation of Apolinario Mabini, appointed Diokno politico-military governor of Cápiz. Diokno held the post for a time then left for other regions of Panay to lead his battles. He established contact with General Martín Teófilo Delgado, commander-in-chief of the Visayan rebel government, and in December, 1898, went to Jaro with his troops to maintain peace and order following the defeat of the Spaniards.

However, the temporary peace brought about by Spanish defeat was cut short by the arrival of the American forces. In November of 1899, General Diokno arrived at Santa Bárbara, Iloílo, where he had several engagements against the American troops. At Passi, he almost lost his life when he was ambushed by several mounted Americans. With his son Ramón, he fought off the enemy and even captured two of them.

The Americans being equipped with the latest weapons, many of the revolutionary officers throughout the archipelago knew that they were fighting a losing war and consequently the majority of them surrendered to the enemy. But Diokno refused to do so. He retreated to the hinterlands of Cápiz and resorted to guerrilla warfare. Badly wounded, he was captured by the Americans in a skirmish in 1901 and imprisoned.

After his release, he led the ordinary life of a citizen. The American government offered him in 1916 the directorship of the Bureau of Agriculture. Diokno refused because he believed it was disloyalty to his country so serve the very foreigners who had suppressed its independence.

He spent the remaining years of his life in Aráyat, Pampanga, where he died on November 2, 1922.

The ancestral house of Ananias Diokno in Taal, Batangas (photo taken by Arnaldo Arnáiz).

León Mª Guerrero, “lion” scientist

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Dr. León Mª Guerrero, the Father of Philippine Pharmacy.

From the illustrious and remarkable Spanish-speaking Casa de los Guerrero comes another Filipino genius: León Mª Guerrero (1853-1935), scientist brother of artist Lorenzo Guerrero and grandfather of diplomat/writer León María Guerrero (his namesake, author of the opus The First Filipino, 1962). Today is his birth anniversary.

Below is a brief biographical sketch of the the man who is considered as the Father of Philippine Pharmacy and Botany. It is again written by Héctor K. Villaroel (from the 1965 book Eminent Filipinos which was published by the National Historical Commission, a precursor of today’s National Historical Institute).

LEÓN MARÍA GUERRERO
(1853-1935)

Born on January 21, 1853 at Ermita, Manila, Dr. León María Guerrero was first among the many Filipinos to put the Philippines on the scientific map of the world.

A man of astounding scientific ability, he finished pharmacy in the University of Santo Tomás in 1876, specializing in pharmacology and botany, particularly the study of flowers. Later, he was awarded the degree of Licentiate in Pharmacy, the highest degree in that line at that time.

In 1887, he became a professor in pharmacy and botany and chemical technician of the Supreme Court in 1888.

During the Revolution, he assumed the editorship of the República Filipina; and upon the founding of the short-lived Philippine Republic University, he served as its dean and professor in pharmacy. Likewise, he was a delegate of three provinces to the Malolos Congress and representative to the first Philippine National Assembly in 1907.

Pursuing other fields of study, like zoology, ornithology, and lepidopterology, he wrote and published several penetrating and brilliant scientific papers which attracted the admiration and respect of Spain and other Spanish-speaking countries.

He died on April 13, 1935.

Let us pray for miracles in Haiti

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Two members of the Filipino peacekeeping troops attend to injured Haitian children in one of the makeshift clinics that United Nations rescue workers set up in Port-au-Prince. PHOTO COURTESY OF AFP PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS CENTER IN HAITI

Let us pray for more miracles and hope in calamity-stricken Haiti. And may our prayers be directed not only to our brother Filipinos out there — we should also pray for the well-being of all the victims in Haiti.

Haiti still needs assistance. A week after the catastrophic earthquake which took thousands of lives, hundreds more are dying everyday due to their injuries. And many more are still underneath the rubble, trying to stay alive. Miraculously, however, many trapped victims –including infants!– are still being pulled alive everyday.

Weary rescue teams from all over the world need more help than they can get. “The moment we stop fighting for each other, that’s the moment that we lose our humanity,” said Adrian Helmsley (portrayed by British actor Chiwetel Ejiofor) in the disaster film 2012. The earthquake which happened in Haiti more than a week ago should concern us all no matter how far that impoverished country is from us. We all live in the same planet. And we have no one else to count on but each other.

If financial assistance is unavailable, the least we can do is pray. And even now, it’s already working. =)

Confirmed: Press Secretary Cerge Remonde dies

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It is confirmed: one of Arroyo’s staunchest defenders, Press Secretary Cerge Remonde, is dead.

Cerge M. Remonde (21 December 1958 - 19 January 2010)

Arroyo press secretary dies—Palace

Press Secretary Cerge Remonde was pronounced dead at 11:51 a.m. Tuesday, according to a Palace official.

“This is a sad day for all of us,” said press undersecretary Butch Junia who broke the news through a text to media waiting outside Makati Medical Center where Remonde was rushed after he was found unconscious in his Bel-Air residence.

Junia quoted Doctor Eric Nubla, head of patient relations, in his text.

Inquirer.net

FILIPINO eSCRIBBLES may have attacked him in the past especially because of his annoying loyalty to this pseudopresidency that we currently have. But his death doesn’t mean that this blog is celebrating.

Our condolences to his loved ones.

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