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How to help Yolanda victims

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So you want to help the victims of super typhoon Yolanda but don’t know where to start. One easy way is to logon to a search engine and look for charitable orgnizations. Then you may donate relief goods and/or cash, or even assist in repackaging the goods themselves. Below are just some of the institutions (with their contact details) that offer immediate assistance…

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ABS-CBN Foundation Sagip Kapamilya

For in-kind donations, ABS-CBN is accepting clothes, shoes, blankets in good condition, canned goods, and drinks. You may send it in ABS-CBN Foundation Sagip Kapamilya drop-off centers.

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Adamson University Charity Hub

Adamson University (AdU), through the Integrated Community Extension Services (ICES), is launching the AdU Charity Hub once more to provide relief and help to those affected by super typhoon Yolanda. The Society of Saint Vincent de Paul (SSVP) and the Vincentian Family Coordinating Council (VFCC) Philippines will be collaborating with AdU in this effort. Please click here for more information.

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Ateneo de Manila University Disaster Response and Management (DReAM) Team

The Ateneo de Manila University Disaster Response and Management Team (DReaM Team), in cooperation with Jesuit NGO Simbahang Lingkod Bayan (SLB) and the Department of Social Welfare and Development, organized a relief operation for the victims of  super typhoon Yolanda. DReaM Team is accepting cash donations and relief goods. Please click here for more information.

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Ayala Foundation, Inc.

The foundation is appealing for help to assist the victims of Typhoon Yolanda. They are accepting cash donations:

* Click here for local credit card holders.
* Click here for US-based donors.
* Click here for A-Deals Subscribers.

Please click here for more information.

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Caritas Filipinas Foundation

Caritas Filipinas Foundation is accepting cash donations through banks and online.

For donation in PhP from overseas:
Bank Name: Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI)
Branch: Intramuros
Account Name: CBCP Caritas Filipinas Foundation Inc.
Account Number: 4951-0071-08
Swift Code: BOPIPHMM

For Donation in USD or EUR from overseas:
Bank Name: Philtrust Bank
Branch: Head Office
Account Name: CBCP Caritas Filipinas Foundation Inc.
DOLLAR Account: 0034-0001716-6
EURO Account: 0035-0000008-6
Swift Code: PHTBPHMM

Please click here for more information.

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Cebú Provincial Government

The provincial government of Cebú calls for volunteers to repack relief goods for Northern Cebú, Leyte and Bojol victims. For those who are interested, you may contact Evelyn Senajón at PSWDO, Ground Floor Executive Bldg., Cebú Provincial Capitol at 254-7198 and 254-8397.

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Department of Social Welfare and Development

Location: NAIA Chapel Road, Pásay City (at the back of CAAP)

The Department of Social Welfare and Development accepts cash deposits through their Landbank of the Philippines account. The account numbers: Current-3122-1011-84 Savings-3124-0055-81. If you wish to volunteer in repacking relief goods, you may call 8512681 for schedule.

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Gawad Kalinga — Operation Walang Iwanan: Typhoon Yolanda

Gawad Kalinga accepts cash donations only at their Philippine Peso Current Account number-3101 0977 56 BPI EDSA Greenhills and US$ Savings Account number-3104 0162 34

* BPI EDSA Greenhills. Their swift code is BOPIPHMM

Please click here for more information.

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GMA Kapuso Foundation

GMA is accepting monetary and in kind donations. For relief goods, the drops off points are:

GMA Kapuso Foundation. 2nd Floor Kapuso Center, GMA Network Drive corner Sámar Streets, Dilimán, Quezon City. Call 928-4299/928-9351.

GMA Kapuso Foundation Warehouse. 366 GMA Compound Tandang Sora Avenue Brgy. Culiat, Quezon City. Call 931-7013.

Monetary donations can be deposited at any Metrobank, UCPB, PNB and Cebuana Lhuillier branch. Please click here for more information.

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Jollibee Group Foundation

The Jollibee Group Foundation accepts cash or check donations to these bank accounts:

PESO ACCOUNT:
Metrobank – Cubáo Araneta Branch
Account Name: Jollibee Group Foundation
Account Number: 473-7-47301401-3

DOLLAR ACCOUNT:
BDO – Megamall Branch
Account Name: Jollibee Foundation, Inc.
Account Number: 100-661-267-008
Swift Code: BNORPHMM

For inquiries or donors who would want to advise regarding their assistance, you may call +63.2.688-7133. For your donations to be properly acknowledged, you may either fax the bank transaction slip at +63.2.688-7038 or send a scanned copy of the bank transaction slip to foundation@jollibee.com.ph with your name, address, and contact number. Please click here for more information.

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McDonald’s

All McDonald’s stores nationwide are now accepting donations in kind such as bottled water, rice, ready to eat food, toiletries, beddings, clothes and medicines for affected communities in Tacloban and other nearby areas devastated by Typhoon Haiyan.

In partnership with ABS-CBN Sagip Kapamilya, Department of Social Welfare and Development and local government units, collected relief goods will be distributed to these affected areas.

For cash or check donations, customers may be advised to directly deposit to:
Account Name: Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Philippines

Citibank N.A.
8741 Citibank Bldg., Paseo de Roxas Makati City
Account No# 060-1374-005
Swift Code: CITIUS33

Account Name: Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Philippines
Bank of the Philippine Islands
CA# 3021-4107-47

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Operation Blessing Philippines

The group is accepting cash donations only. The following are the details to send money.

Metrobank
Account name: OPERATION BLESSING FOUNDATION PHILS., INC.
Account number: 270-3-27050273-4

Banco de Oro (Bdo)
Account name: OPERATION BLESSING FOUNDATION PHILS., INC.
Account number: 30000-55279

Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI)
Account name: OPERATION BLESSING FOUNDATION PHILS., INC.
Account number: 3001-0040-33

You may also send your donation in the form of check or postal money order payable to Operation Blessing through mail. Address it to Operation Blessing, P.O. Box 2572 MCPO, 1265 Makati, Philippines. Please click here for more information.

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Philippine Daily Inquirer

Philippine Red Cross


You may donate to the Philippine Red Cross (PRC) through SMS by texting RED and send it to 2899 for Globe and 4143 for Smart. You can donate the following denominations: Globe: ₱5, ₱25, ₱100, ₱300, ₱500 or ₱1,000 and for Smart: ₱10, ₱25, ₱50, ₱100, ₱300, ₱500, or ₱1.000.

For cash deposits:

Banco De Oro
Peso: 00-453-0018647
Dollar: 10-453-0039482
Swift Code: BNORPHMM

Metrobank
Peso: 151-3-041631228
Dollar: 151-2-15100218-2
Swift Code: MBTCPHMM

Philippine National Bank
Peso: 3752 8350 0034
Dollar: 3752 8350 0042
Swift Code: PNBMPHMM

Unionbank of the Philippines
Peso: 1015 4000 0201
Dollar: 1315 4000 0090
Swift code: UBPHPHMM

For in-kind donation you may send it to the PRC – National Headquarters in Manila. You may also contact them to arrange donation pick-up.

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United Nations Children’s Fund

The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) are accepting cash donations. The amount that you may donate from the choices are ₱1,500, ₱3, 300, and ₱5,000. Please click here for more information.

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University of the Philippines

The University of the Philippines (UP) Office of the Student Regent are accepting donations in cash or kind. Their drop off point is Vinzon’s Hall, UP Dilimán, Quezon City. You may contact Alex Castro at 0917-8725396 or tweet him at @uscupdiliman, Eds 0927384-1392 and Zie 0916796-5740. Please click here for more information.

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IMPORTANT NOTE: The government has been receiving some flak over the seemingly incompetent handling of the crisis, particulary the distribution of relief goods and medicine. One major complaint is that these have not been reaching their designated areas on time, if at all. To my observation, I think one major reason why the flow of relief goods is slow is because there is a severe lack of repackers. There has been a steady supply of donations all right, but not enough people to repack them, hence slowing the pace of our government’s relief efforts. This has been confirmed by Twitter user Lendl Tan-Monterola (@_lendl_) who was part of one of the repackaging teams.

To those who read this: please, please, PLEASE spend a few hours of your time to join the repackaging of relief goods. Our countrymen in the Visayas region are starving every day. Thank you so much.

Hunger thoughts on Yolanda

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I went on an errand to Calambâ last Monday to pay some bills. I accidentally brought insufficient funds, thus I wasn’t able to buy me some lunch. I was waiting for hours on a long queue while contemplating for food and drink. A smelly character beside me was munching some deep-fried peanuts! I had half a mind asking for some, even if it’s just a couple of half-burnt, half-fried salted garlic bits. It was a crazy, debilitating moment for me, some regular guy with a huge appetite (don’t let my thin frame fool you).

I started to weaken, my sight becoming a blur. I had a book with me to keep me company, but I couldn’t even read it anymore. And I must have swallowed a glassful of spit, a pathetic way to remain hydrated.

I just couldn’t wait to get home!

And then I remembered our poor brothers and sisters in the Visayas region, most of whom haven’t eaten for days on a regular basis. I just missed my lunch, but these poor souls have been missing food for days. Not just a few hours… DAYS!

So don’t you ever dare call their desperate search for food as LOOTING.

To those reading this on their comfy seats who think they have bigger problems: THINK AGAIN.

The Filipino Spirit vs. Yolanda and the Bojol tremors: brief thoughts from a historical viewpoint

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The Filipino Spirit vs. Yolanda and the Bojol tremors: brief thoughts from a historical viewpoint

Before 1565, we were a disunited bunch. Filipinas as we know it today (as Luzón, Visayas, and Mindanáo) did not exist yet during that time. And it is with certainty that Taclobanons back then were only concerned with their own territory and people. But so it was with Tagalogs, Cebuanos, Bicolanos, and all the rest of the ethnolinguistic tribes that were soon destined to become part of the Filipino nation. Noóng unang panahón, caniá-caniá talagá silá. Each group were concerned only with their internal affairs because each thought of themselves as independent.

But after 1565, all these tribes became ONE NATION. It was our CHRISTIAN FAITH which binded us into ONE PEOPLE. That is why all of us, whether we are in Aparri or in Joló, wept and grieved when the island province of Bojol fell under the mercy of last month’s killer tremors. And now we have the heartwrenching aftermath of Yolanda‘s deadly wrath to contend with. Much of the Visayas region was ravaged by devastating winds never thought to have been possible before. But among the towns and cities that were affected, it was the historic city of Tacloban in Leyte Province, “Ang Puso ng Silañgang Cabisayaan” (The Heart of Eastern Visayas), that was totally destroyed.

So even though many Filipinos have never been to either Bojol or Tacloban, they all feel the same pain and anguish that Bojolanos and Taclobanons feel now because through centuries of Filipinization, they have become our brother Filipinos. They are no longer Waray, and we are no longer Tagalog, Cebuano, Bicolano, etc. We are simply Filipinos as created by the FAITH bequeathed to us by Our Lord and Savior. We have become ONE FILIPINO nation because of our FAITH.

No wonder why, even though our archipielago is a Babel of tongues and microcultures, we do not hesitate to help each other in times of distress. Just like what is occurring at this very moment (it would have been unimaginable before 1565 that a Tagalog would be helping a Visayan and vice versa).

And rest assured that with this FAITH of ours, we shall rise again, in the same manner that it created our unified spirit in 1565…

¡Un gran saludo al espíritu filipino!

Looting in typhoon-devastated Tacloban

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The streets of Taclóban City in Leyte were in chaos Saturday as several residents began looting grocery stores and breaking into shops for food and other basic items they needed to survive in the aftermath of typhoon Yolanda.
Video footage recorded by the team of GMA News correspondent Jiggy Manícad showed several men breaking into what appeared to be the storage area of a grocery store in the city and grabbing as much bread and softdrinks bottles as they can get.
Manicad said some residents have even resorted to forcibly entering fast food shops and destroying ATMs to get food and cash.
Click here for the rest of this news article. And click here to watch the video.
http://diversityhuman.com/hollywood/index.php/Friend-Blogs/tacloban-typhoon-victims-robbed-steal-gaisano-mall-goods

“…sana po ang armed forces macapagpadala po ng fuerza…
—Ted Failón—

“What breakdown of “law and order”? When people are starving and the government cannot do anything, it’s their right to take over supermarkets and malls to distirbute food and feed themselves. They should really do it in an organized manner that can provide equitable distribution to all the needy.”
—Sonny Melencio, Chairperson of the Partido Lakas ng Masa

“Whose law and whose order are we supposed to protect? This is not looting. These are the people trying to protect themselves from an uncaring and murderous system — a system that kills. We should call for the people to take over supermarkets, rice depots and so on, and take control of food and relief distribution themselves. Not looting. It’s wealth distribution.”
—Reihana Mohideen, Chairperson of Transform Asia

“Thou shalt not steal.”
—Exodus 20:15—

“And behold one came and said to him: Good master, what good shall I do that I may have life everlasting? Who said to him: Why asketh thou me concerning good? One is good, God. But if thou wilt enter into life, keep the commandments. He said to him: Which? And Jesus said: thou shalt do no murder, thou shalt not commit adultery, thou shalt not steal, thou shalt not bear false witness.”
—Matthew 19:16-18—

Everything you need to know about Aling Yolanda

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Sorry I’m not able to blog here regularly anymore. Life is always on the way. Been too much of a busy bee that I wasn’t even able to blog about last month’s heritage-killer quake (but I did mention it here in brief).

As I write this, Filipinas is now bearing the brunt of one of the most powerful super typhoons in history (the winds are howling like mad outside our apartment unit). So powerful it is that I have no other choice but to “invoke my right” to be absent from work tonight. Also, I thought of sharing to the lazy internet user what I found out about Super Typhoon Haiyan, known locally as Yolanda (usually preceded by a hashtag by the social media addict):

Super Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) comes from a Chinese word which means “petrel”, a tube-nosed seabird. From time to time, you might stumble upon the characters 海燕 just to emphasize its being Chinese.
Wind: 270 KPH (as of 11/8/2013, 2:00:00 PM [Malay Peninsula Standard Time])
Location: 11.4N 237.4E
Movement: W at 25 mph

Below are some of the strongest monster twisters in world history:

Super Typhoon Nancy (1961), 215 mph winds, 882 mb. Made landfall as a Cat 2 in Japan, killing 191 people.
Super Typhoon Violet (1961), 205 mph winds, 886 mb pressure. Made landfall in Japan as a tropical storm, killing 2 people.
Super Typhoon Ida (1958), 200 mph winds, 877 mb pressure. Made landfall as a Cat 1 in Japan, killing 1269 people.
Super Typhoon Haiyan (2013), 195 mph winds, 895 mb pressure. Made landfall in the Philippines at peak strength.
Super Typhoon Kit (1966), 195 mph winds, 880 mb. Did not make landfall.
Super Typhoon Sally (1964), 195 mph winds, 895 mb. Made landfall as a Cat 4 in the Philippines.
(Source: Dr. Jeff Masters’ wunderground.com)

It ain’t called super for nothing: tropical cyclone Haiyan/Yolanda strikes the typhoon-prone municipality of Guiuan in Sámar Oriental, like a freaky boss.

• Super Typhoon Haiyan had winds of 195 mph and gusts of 235 mph. This is one of the highest wind speeds ever recorded in a storm in world history.
• It made landfall as the most powerful typhoon or hurricane in recorded history, as based on wind speed measurements from satellites.
• The strength of Haiyan is equal to that of an extremely powerful Category 5 hurricane in the Atlantic. (Typhoons are the same type of storms as hurricanes).
• No hurricane in the Atlantic has ever been this strong; Hurricane Camille hit the U.S. Gulf Coast with an estimated wind speed of 190 mph.

Fight web surfing remissness! Click here for more!

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“Many might wonder if the proper name Yolanda is Latinate. Yes, it is Latinate. In Latin, it is Violanda or Violans, which, respectively, means ‘she who shall be violated’ or ‘the violating one’.”
Dei Præsidio Fultus

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My paternal grandfather, Sr. Don Godofredo Alas y Sarmiento (1925-1997) of Unisan, Tayabas, would have turned 88 today. Requiescat in pace.

Tropical storm Maring pummels San Pedro, La Laguna

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Habagat and tropical storm Maring. A terrible combination.

This is probably the worst flooding I’ve ever witnessed in the Sampaguita Capital of Filipinas since we moved here in 2004. So when the torrential rains weakened late this morning, I decided to take a walk (or should I say, wade) around the young city. It was a detestable sight.

San Vicente Road underneath San Pedro bridge.

Floodwaters entered many homes.

Calle Mabini at the Población.

Futile dredging.

¡Sigue, lañgóy pá!

National highway. Right goes to Población; left goes towards the San Pedro bridge leading to Muntinlupà City.

The murky waters of the San Isidro River (upstream) taken on top of San Pedro bridge.

Boundary.

San Pedro’s public information officer and local historian Gaudencio “Sonny” Ordoña (white cap) leading a team of rescuers.

Cameraman from GMA News.

The railway below San Pedro bridge. It was engulfed by the rampaging waters of the San Isidro River twice this morning, destroying the shanties of these people.

A variety of filth is impeding the flow of the San Isidro River!

:-(

And now my feet and legs are itching like mad.

CLICK HERE for more photos. In the meantime…

‘Maring’ may turn into typhoon before heading to Taiwan — PAGASA

By 

4:31 pm | Monday, August 19th, 2013

MANILA, Philippines — Tropical storm “Maring” (international name Trami) may still intensify into a typhoon before it leaves the country’s area of responsibility on Thursday morning and heads for Taiwan, according to the country’s weather bureau.

Luzon would continue to feel the effects of the habagat (southwest monsoon) being enhanced by Maring, until Wednesday, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) said on Monday.

The weather bureau said the habagat dumped the most rain from Sunday morning to Monday on Cavite Province and on Manila in the National Capital Region.

Read more: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/469103/maring-may-turn-into-typhoon-before-heading-to-taiwan-pagasa#ixzz2cP9vUwbU

There you go.

Remembering the Mount Pinatubo explosion of 1991

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Today we commemorate the 22nd anniversary of Mount Pinatubo’s Plinian / Ultra-Plinian eruption.

Help Cagayán de Oro (YouTube)

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More help is needed. Please.

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More help needed for Japan’s tsunami victims

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Twenty days have passed since the devastating earthquake and tsunami in Tōhoku, Japan. And each passing day, the death toll still rises. But for the hundreds of thousands of survivors who are left homeless and economically crippled, their current situation makes those who died from this deadly double-calamity appear to be more fortunate.

The humanitarian response that Japan has been receiving from all parts of the world has been awesome and heartwarming. Sadly, it is not enough. Millions of dollars are still needed to help rehabilitate the areas and people affected by the tsunami (since Japan is always earthquake-ready, the earthquake seemed to have had little adverse effect; it was the tsunami which did Japan in). It is estimated that the cost of the earthquake and tsunami that devastated parts of our Asian neighbor could reach more than $300 billion, making it the world’s most expensive natural disaster on record.

Twenty days may have passed, but that doesn’t mean that everything’s OK already in Japan. Thousands are still homeless; many of them are still in evacuation centers with little food, clothing, medicine, and other personal effects. Our Japanese brothers still need our help. We, the lucky ones here in the Philippines who are inside air-conditioned houses with comfortable amenities and internet connection, should all do our share. Believe me, even a twenty-peso donation is already a lot of help.

Please click on the names of the below organizations to know more information on how to send donations to our unfortunate Japanese brothers.

All Hands Volunteers

Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines

Catholic Relief Services

Convoy of Hope

Philippine Red Cross

7 Eleven

This crisis ain’t over till it’s over. Let us all unite to help Japan’s sun rise again. After all, we all live in the same house called planet Earth.

Movie scenes from Old Macati City

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Aside from relishing memories of my problem-free childhood, one reason why I enjoy watching old Tagalog movies (particularly those from the 70s, 80s, and early 90s) is that –more often than not– they contain so many scenes of classic Philippine landmarks, particularly Metro Manila where I grew up.

It’s so interesting and fun to see how Filipinos back then used to dress up. You’ll notice how places change so fast. Many landmarks such as downtown Manila, Macati City, and Quezon City didn’t have much skyscrapers and multinational fastfoods back then (and the air pollution was a wee bit tolerable compared to our times). Not too long ago, there were not much traffic jams, no MRT, no Skyway, no pesky MMDA peeps. The people had no cellphones; they make do with telephone booths which had those familiar red phones where you had to insert a couple of twenty-five-centavo coins which still had the butterfly emblem in them (don’t you just miss them?). And you’d always make fun of how Filipinas used to sport their hair, and how crazy young Filipinos were for small-sized Crispa tees! The street jargon used during those days sound funny today. Not to mention the wheels they used to drive — you’d say that they might be towed if spotted in major highways nowadays!

The YouTube clip in this blogpost (uploaded by rontorres01), is from the action flick Partida starring the late, great National Artist for Film (who should have been our president if not for some opportunist who, thankfully, will leave Malacañang after this year’s summer elections), Fernando Poe, Jr. It was shot in 1985, if I’m not mistaken. The first few minutes of the film will feature a high-octane car chase scene (impossible to accomplish these days) in Macati City. Metro Manileños will notice familiar places where the action scenes took place: Osmeña Highway, a brightly lit Magallanes interchange (sans the Skyway!), and Ayala Avenue without its gigantic buildings and horrible traffic that we are all familiar today.

Could it be that FPJ et al deliberately prolonged this Macati scene for posterity?

Enjoy if you may.

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