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Monthly Archives: August 2012

Wanted: Spanish-speaking voice-over talents for spanish cartoons!

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ambientmedia®, a multimedia production house, is in need of Spanish-speaking voice-over talents for an upcoming anime which will be uploaded in YouTube. They are in need of the following:

1) Male who sounds between 26 to 33 (baritone voice will do); they need three (3).
2) Female who sounds between 26 to 33; they need two (2).
3) An older guy who sounds between 30 to 40; they need four (4).

If you meet the above requirements, you may contact Lynnel de Mesa at lynnel@ambientmedia.ph. You may also dial (0917)537-8620 or 807-44-33. ambientmedia® is located at Carmel House, #29 Buencamino Street, Alabang, Muntinlupà City.

The first version of this anime (entitled Jurassika) can be seen in YouTube.

The Spanish version will comprise 11 episodes.

Be part of local media history! This will be the first Spanish-language cartoons to be voiced-over by Filipino talents! Pues, ¿qué estáis esperando? ¡Esta es vuestra oportunidad! ¡No dejéis para mañana lo que podáis hacer hoy! 😀

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Church ruins of Lumangbayan in Nasugbú, Batangas

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To many Metro Manileños, Nasugbú, Batangas is a place that is synonymous to family and barcada beach outings. The first time I was here was way back in college together with my neighborhood friends. And since then (until now), that is the only thing I know about Nasugbú: its famous beaches.

During our 12th-year anniversary at Muntíng Buhañgin Beach Camp, Inc., Násugbu, Batangas last year, 13 September 2011. Yep, that’s beach-addict Mrs. Alas.

The second time I visited it was last year, during me and my wife’s 12th-year anniversary last year (13 September). After a drizzly afternoon of swimming at picturesque Muntíng Buhañgin Beach Camp, we visited the old población, like what we usually do whenever we go out of town, to take pictures of ancestral houses and the center of activities in each Filipino town during the Spanish times: the town church.

We got a bit confused when we started asking around for the location of the town church, especially when we did see the towering structure of the town’s Saint Francis Xavier Parish Church.

Iglesia de San Francisco de Javier, Nasugbú, Batangas. Its interiors, albeit humble, is one of the most beautiful I have ever seen.

The tricycle driver whom we asked for directions insisted that it was not the town’s original church. I was starting to believe him, especially since the structure is indeed very modern. He led us to someplace else, outside the town proper. We had no idea what church was this guy talking about, nor where he was taking us. But we felt that we’re off to another adventure.

And I was right.

My wife (wearing orange) examining the ruins in Barrio 6, Lumangbayan.

Upon seeing the ruins, I felt a bit ashamed of myself. Here I am, parading myself as a passionate online history buff, but how come I haven’t even heard of this?! Fail.

Inside the structure.

Spanish-Filipino war? There was no war. Rebellion is the correct word.

I learned that the name of this church was Iglesia de Nuestra Señora de la Escalera or Our Lady of the Staircase (probably in reference to the Loretto Chapel in Santa Fe, Nuevo México, but I could be wrong). According to stories from the locals, this church was burned by the Spaniards at the height of the Katipunan rebellion (the so-called Philippine Revolution).

Huh? Something’s quite wrong with the picture.

The Spaniards burned their own structure? A structure they considered holy?

I began to realize that the site has become yet another perfect example of the notorious, malicious, and twisted leyenda negra.

This 19th-century church was said to have been destroyed during the skirmish between the Spanish troops and the Filipinos (Katipuneros). In the Nasugbú Tourism Quarterly (April-June 2000 issue), Francisco Villacrusis wrote that after imprisoning the townsfolk inside this church, the Spaniards burned it down, killing the people inside. But Villacrusis did not cite any reference. And his claim is preposterous. Here are my reasons:

1) The Spaniards, being devote Catholics, would never have done such an atrocity.
2) There were only a few Spaniards in the Philippines, from start (1565) to finish (1898). As a matter of fact, during that time, the only “white face” that one usually encounters in far-flung villages is that of the friar.
3) To the best of my knowledge, there was no other instance of “church-burning” that was instigated by the Spanish troops in other places in the country outside of Násugbu.

The only church-burner that I know of are the Katipuneros themselves. Andrés Bonifacio was a church-burner himself. As a matter of fact, he attempted to burn the church in nearby Indang in Cavite province. And he did considerable damage to the church.

In view of the foregoing, all accusing fingers should point to the Katipuneros, not the meager Spanish troops.

And many of these so-called “Spanish troops” were native Filipinos, by the way…

Click here to view the whole album.

Meanwhile, in my adoptive province of La Laguna, there’s another church left in ruins, and it’s in Calauan…

Iglesia de San Isidro Labrador y San Roque (1860-1925?), Calauan, La Laguna. Photographed by Ronald A. Yu during our visit there last weekend (18 August 2012).

But that’s another story (coming very soon!).

Around 80% of Metro Manila and surrounding provinces are submerged in floodwaters!

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Quick report

No, there is no typhoon taking place. But nonstop monsoon rains left 80 percent of Metro Manila flooded on Tuesday (7th of August) forced hundreds of thousands to escape out of their inundated homes, sparking traumatic recollections of the calamitous tropical storm “Ondoy” three years ago. Last night, Malacañang Palace suspended classes in Metro Manila and the nine provinces surrounding it.

Executive Secretary Paquito Ochoa issued Memorandum Circular No. 34, ordering the suspension of classes Thursday at all levels, including postgraduate courses, in Metro Manila, Zambales, Bataán, Pampanga, Pangasinán, Tárlac, Bulacán, La Laguna, Cavite, and Rizal.

Actually, it has been raining for more than a week, even before typhoon Gener struck. The flash floods began gradually on Monday and severely swelled last Tuesday. Many places are in a state of calamity, especially communities along the Mariquina River and Laguna de Bay. Before last night’s memorandum, Malacañang Palace also issued a directive canceling work in both government and private offices. Even call centers/BPOs were not excluded from this, prompting the Business Processing Association of the Philippines to appeal; this is because this industry caters to international clients.

Now the sun is finally up, but barely. And the floods don’t mitigate that fast. And think of the countless families who were rendered homeless. Please, let us not allow ourselves to be mere spectators of this tragedy. We are all part of this…

How to help? Please click HERE and HERE.

We can all get through this together. That is the FILIPINO spirit. Dapat sama-sama sa hirap at guinhawa.

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Special thanks to my cousin, DJ Jam Alas of Magic 89.9, for the info on how to help the flood victims.

Pass the RH Bill now!

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Yep. You heard me right. Pass that damned bill right now. As in RIGHT NOW. Anyway, it’s gonna end up like that laughable Clean Air Act — it will join the company of Alf and Mikey Macapagal Arroyo’s horrible showbiz career in the long list of “forgotten memories”. In a few month’s time, nobody’s even gonna give a hoot that it divided this I-just-love-smoochin’-Uncle-Sam’s-candy-a$s-24-hours-a-day-seven-days-a-week banana republic for the past couple ‘o years. Just give it a few months, and those funny internet trolls and haters who have been commenting in defense of the R(oad to) H(ell) Bill in various online articles all over the web will soon discuss the economic merits of breast  implantation, the tantric effects of sex change, and the philosophical satisfaction of mutual masturbation. But the RH Bill?

F that one, man. It’s a law now. We havin’ a good time with Ragnarok and Bang Bros! Woot woot!”

Oh, yes. The RH Bill will do yet another Clean Air ACT. Like this sorry 1999 law as well as countless other legislative disappointments, the RH Bill will never bear fruit. We see ’em violators every day: plastics burning in backyards and vacant lots lookin’ more like jamboree campsites; buses and jeepneys competing  against each other as to who are the best highway smoke belchers there are; smoke stacks from factories and power plants spewing the blackest smoke all year round, as if hell itself has an entrance from within their edifices.

Anybody been sanctioned?

In the Philippines, laws —not promises— are made to be broken. 😀 So believe me when I say this: the RH Bill will never be implemented “correctly” nor will it bear fruit the way pro-RH kiddos wanted it to prosper. It will NEVER save our economy, much less help the poor.

Can’t wait to see the look on their faces… so to our beloved congress homies, will ya PUH-LEAZE PASS THAT DARNED BILL ASAP?!!!

Whoa?! Why THIS?! LOL!!! Go figure! ;p

Oh, and one more thing… the only true beneficiaries here would be the authors of the bill. Oooooooooooohh, fat paychecks are comin’ at ya! So don’t say that I didn’t say NO TO RH BILL! I said YES! So please, share me summa da loot!!!

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The Promises Have Not Come True

The arrival of oral contraception in the early 1960s and of ‘liberal’ abortion (1967) ushered in the ‘sexual revolution’. Enthusiasts promised this would mean:

—    every child would be a wanted child;

—    illegitimacy and unwanted pregnancy would almost disappear;

—    abortion rates would be low and soon decline;

—    families would be happier and marriages stronger, and;

—    we’d all —especially women— be happier and healthier.

Instead, we have had:

—    ever more unplanned pregnancies;

—    4 million abortions; soaring abortion rates and ever more post-abortion trauma;

—    an unparalleled rise in single motherhood and one-parent families;

—    a surge in sexually transmitted diseases — some of them passed on to babies;

—    women’s bodies having to cope with increasingly powerful chemicals and a serious rise in female infertility;

—    more sex-related crime against women and children;

—    more domestic violence, especially against women, and more teenage crime and violence;

—    rampant pornography, and;

—    declining marriage rates and now 40% of marriages breaking down.

Increased abortion and contraception have been the direct cause of some of these and are related to the others.

Faced with them, the government wants yet more contraception and more abortion — which is like trying to put out fire with petrol?

The truth is that a social experiment, launched in the 1960s, has failed.

(From the book Conspiracy Against Life, 1996, Two Hearts Media Organization, p. 248)

Cabuyao City, La Laguna!

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Congratulations to the people of Cabuyao! Their town has just been converted into a component city over the weekend!

SAN PEDRO, La Laguna — Cabuyao town in La Laguna is now officially a city even if only less than 20 percent of its registered voters turned out for a plebiscite on Saturday.

The final count showed 22,132 residents voted in favor of the town’s conversion to a city, while only 2,538 residents voted “no,” according to lawyer Juanito Icaro, Commission on Elections director in CALABARZON (Cavite, La Laguna, Batangas, Rizal, Quezon).

A picture of Cabuyao’s town plaza which I took two years ago. This photo is currently being used by Wikipedia for its Cabuyao article without my permission, LOL!

Now we can say that Cabuyao is La Laguna province’s youngest city! ¡Enhorabuena, Ciudad de Cabuyao!

Read the rest of the story here!

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