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The end is near?

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SKYPEing at the office:
[4/20/2010 10:43:57 PM] Pepe Alas: Massive earthquakes, tsunamis, drought, famine, and recently, an enormous volcanic eruption in Europe.
[4/20/2010 10:44:08 PM] Pepe Alas: I think the end is really near.
[4/20/2010 10:44:26 PM] Pepe Alas: So tell me, why should we still pursue our advocacies?
[4/20/2010 10:44:49 PM] Arnold Diaz Arnaiz: we should not
[4/20/2010 10:44:51 PM] Arnold Diaz Arnaiz: :D

There is, I think, a cause for concern. News about massive earthquakes around the globe (Haiti, Chile, and China) and the notorious number of lives it took are becoming more and more common. Tsunami fear caused by those tremors is all over coastline communities. The El Niño phenomenon is still wreaking havoc throughout the Philippines and its surrounding areas. The temperature continues to rise all the world over. And recently, Eyjafjallajökull’s eruption somewhere in Iceland caused a large-scale volcanic ash which disrupted air traffic across Europe and in some parts of North America. Drought and famine is nothing new, too…

…just like thoughts of war.

For instance, the US is always noisy with the way they’ve been policing enemy countries such as North Korea and some Middle East countries (particularly Iran). These WASPs always cry foul over news of nuclear arms being manufactured and stored in these countries. But Arnaldo is correct in his observation: who, in turn, are checking the US’ nuclear arms and its rising military personnel?

No one. Not even the United Nations. Besides, where the heck is the UN’s general headquarters located? LOL!!!

“Hollywood movies are sending us a message, man,” Arnaldo told me this morning as we were going home from our night shift. “Remember those doomsday movies such as Deep Impact and, what was that recent film which starred Danny Glover? 2012? The US presidents in those movies are all blacks.”

And from what race is the actual US president in real life?

Coincidence or conspiracy? I thought Arnaldo is getting crazy, but he does have a point. What was that which Mel Gibson (as Jerry Fletcher) said in the film Conspiracy Theory? “A good conspiracy is unprovable. I mean, if you can prove it, it means they screwed up somewhere along the line.” Of course.

I believe in “good conspiracy theories” — there’s the Club of Rome. Then the Committee of 300. And the nefarious schemes of the CIA against enemy countries. All of them are under the umbrella of the notoriously secretive Freemasons, the enemy of my faith. The claims of all those who have written extensively against these mentioned organizations made sense to what is happening all over the world: drug trade, broken families, same sex marriages, prostitution, anti-life devices (contraceptives), the myth of an overpopulated world, even rock music and pop culture, etc. All I can say about this are but two simple words: evil exists. But not for long.

Because the end is near, I think.

So if it is, why still continue this quixotic advocacy that I share with Arnaldo, Señor Gómez, and JMG?

For hundreds of years, various prophets have preached about the end of the world. Prophets since biblical times have been warning people that the end is near. But it’s already 2010. However, I would like to share these thoughtful words from New York Times bestselling author Richard Moran in his scary book Doomsday: End-of-the-World Scenarios:

Like everything in life… there are some things we can control and some things we cannot.

We can try to do something about the worsening greenhouse effect, cyberterrorism, looming plagues, bioengineering blunders, and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Yet any effort we make to forestall or eliminate one of more of these threats will require that we as humans undergo a very fundamental transformation in our way of looking at the world and at each other.

We shall have to put aside the greed, arrogance toward nature, and cultural, religious, and racial hatreds that have brought us to the brink of catastrophe. Throughout the entire history of humankind, we have not been able to conquer these demons. Can we do it now — even if not doing so might will mean the extinction of our species? History and reason tell us probably not. In all likelihood, we shall doom ourselves.

As to the extinction scenarios that are not in our hands –asteroid impacts, massive volcanic eruptions, the coming ice age, mega-tsunamis, and insect invasions– there is simply nothing we can do to alter the inevitable. We may think we can use our mighty technological prowess to save our species — nuclear weapons to destroy incoming asteroids, giant dams to divert warm ocean currents and melt advancing ice sheets — but in the end all our efforts will be futile, for it is nature, not man, that reigns supreme on Earth…

…Perhaps in the final analysis, we should not worry about tomorrow –for tomorrow will be what tomorrow will be– but rather seize each day we are given. Love our families, cherish our friends, and forgive our enemies, open our eyes to the beauty of nature around us. Before it’s too late, we need to stop and smell the roses, for roses — like the human species — cannot bloom forever.

While there is life, there is hope. A big AMEN to that.

Spread the love! Malate love! PT. 8 (Malate, Manila)

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ST. PAUL UNIVERSITY MANILA’S VERSION OF MALATE LOVE!

Our Malate Valentine’s weekend stroll ends with this blogpost. =)

There are many homeless and hungry souls in the streets of Malate. =(

Near where the homeless people sleep, luxury establishments line up the district's impoverished streets.

But the Malate homeless don't go hungry all the time. And that is because of the piousness, generosity, and love of this Catholic university...

These hungry people patiently await the opening of St. Paul University Manila's gates for a hearty meal for free!

Yeyette learns more about their daily ordeal.

The little girl's mom asked for Yeyette's Valentine's balloon. And so she gave it to them as a Valentine's gift. Malate love!

St. Paul University Manila feeds hungry people (for free, of course) during Sundays.

With street philosophers!

The old lady offered her little granddaughter to us for adoption. But Yeyette politely declined, telling her the importance of a family staying together through good times or bad.

Their humble abode -- a pushcart.

An elder Manileña who was born during the last war, telling stories of how Malate looked like during her childhood days.

The university's charity program is about to begin.

Students distributing tickets to the poor. The tickets are convertible to free meals inside the university grounds. Unfortunately, Yeyette and I weren't allowed to go inside; they required as to write an official letter. And we had no more time for that. Maybe next time.

It would have jumped onto my neck if it weren't fettered.

What the local government failed to do, St. Paul University Manila accomplishes.

Saint Paul University Manila is owned and administered by the Congregation of the Sisters of St. Paul of Chartres.

The University started out originally in 1911 as a Novitiate, a training center for young Filipino women wishing to become Sisters of St. Paul of Chartres, on a swampy piece of land in Malate.

Congratulations to the Sisters of St. Paul of Chartres and to the students of St. Paul University Manila. You are doing God's work! Be proud of your inherent Malate love!

On our way back to Robinson's Place Manila, we saw these cute, jelly like stuff which can grow on water.

Valentine's Day articles being sold on the sidewalk.

Inside Robinson's Place Manila after the lovely street strolling.

Love conquers all!

The Valentine's weekend was a blast! We mingled and chatted and shared stories to so many Manileños of Malate! We then decided to go to my mom's place near the mall. We haven't seen her for almost three years! Time to spread the love even more!

We ended up with my mom and beautiful sisters in their condo unit inside one of Manila's tallest buildings!

With my mom. She's only 17 years older than me!

Happy Valentine's Month! Spread the love! Malate love! =)

RELATED LINK
ST. PAUL UNIVERSITY MANILA

Spread the love! Malate love! PT. 7 (Malate, Manila)

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DOWNTOWN MALATE Our Malate Valentine’s Day love stroll continues. =)

Roxas Boulevard was named after the fourth President of the Philippines, Manuel Roxas.

I punk'd Roxas Boulevard!!!

1322 Golden Empire Tower

1322 -- one of the highest buildings in Manila.

A thing of beauty -- is a lifeless urban tree? Joke. I'm just rhyming here.

A street mom teaching her street kid to wave at the camera.

Calle Alas? Not. It's Calle Salas, named after a Spanish newspaper editor in Manila by the name of Romero Salas. Before the 1930s, this street used to be known as Calle Divisoria.

Calle Marcelo H. del Pilar, named after the famed Filipino writer and propagandist from Bulacán. He almost became the national hero when the 1901 Philippine Commission was looking for one. But they unanimously chose José Rizal mainly because of the latter's dramatic death (compared to del Pilar's natural death due to tuberculosis).

Malate bars -- dead by morning.

Calle Santa Mónica was named after San Agustín's mother. It was said that she stormed heaven with her prayers for the conversion of her then sinful son.

This looks ancient!

Deeper into the heart of Malate.

Malate Adriático Grand Residences

Robinson's Place Manila is situated between the districts of Malate and Ermita. But technically, it's already within the jurisdiction of Ermita.

Calle Adriático was named after the hispanist, Macario Adriático. He was a Mindoreño representative to the First Philippine Assembly. Calle Adriático was then known as Calle Dakota. Up to now, old Manila folk --and many a jeepney driver-- still refer to this street as Dakota. This long street is shared by Malate and Ermita.

Robinson's Place Manila facing the lively (and deliciously lovely) district of Malate.

My lovely wife Yeyette posing in front of Robinson's greenery.

Calle Pedro Gil was named after a journalist-turned-politician during the American occupation of the Philippines. He later became an ambassador to Argentina. Calle Pedro Gil was once known as Calle Herrán (some people still refer to it as such) in honor of the Spanish naval captain José de la Herrán who defended Manila Bay against the American invaders in the now famous (and one-sided) Battle of Manila Bay.

Spread the Malate love!

Eurotel's behind the branches and leaves.

Along Calle Orosa are a couple of postwar houses.

Calle María Y. Orosa (once known as Calle Florida) was named after the famous Filipina home economist who invented the “clay oven”. She fought against the Japanese and was killed in battle.

Calle Julio Nákpil is a street named in honor of the musician-patriot from Quiapò who fought under Andrés Bonifacio. He later married Bonifacio's widow, Gregoria de Jesús.

Calle Guerrero (formerly known as Georgia Street) is from Luis Mª Guerrero of the illustrious Familia Guerrero of nearby Ermita district. He was a famous pediatrician during his time.

In this video, we interview a homeless man who sleeps on the streets of Malate. He said the money given to him as a relocation fee by the people who took over his former home was stolen by a certain “Chairman López”.

This arátiles tree serves as shade for the homeless man we interviewed. Little did we know that we're about to meet more homeless people (to be concluded tomorrow)...

RELATED LINKS Love, love, love, Malate Love! (Malate, Manila) Spread the love! Malate love! (Malate, Manila) Spread the love! Malate love! PT. 2 (Malate, Manila) Spread the love! Malate love! PT. 3 (Malate, Manila) Spread the love! Malate love! PT. 4 (Malate, Manila) Spread the love! Malate love! PT. 5 (Malate, Manila) Spread the love! Malate love! PT. 6 (Malate, Manila)

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