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Tinik ng Teatro Celebrates 30 years in Adamson University

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Press Release February 9, 2016 TNT 30th Anniversary Celebration

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Tinik ng Teatro Celebrates 30 years in Adamson University

Hundreds of Adamsonian Tinik ng Teatro (TNT) alumni trooped back to ST Quadrangle last 6 February 2016 to celebrate their 30th anniversary hosted by the Tinik ng Teatro Alumni Association.

TNT is now officially the oldest student-based theater organization in Adamson University which started life in 1986. “This is a milestone for all of us; three decades of fruitful and meaningful journey for our beloved organization is no ordinary feat!” according to TNT Alumni Association president Teri Onor a.k.a Dexter Domínguez. The celebrity and Board Member from Bataán assumed the TNT alumni presidency post on 1 January 2016 after its two-term president, Mark Anthony Legaspi, succumbed to diabetes complications in December last year, shortly before the New Year.

“I am personally excited on the synergy that we will work on with Adamson University management, specifically the Cultural Affairs Office and the Adamson Grand Alumni Association. We have a pipeline of projects that we will pursue in the coming months aimed to nurture and advance the performing arts in Adamson,” added by Onor.

TNT Alumni Association was formed in 2009 in time for the 2011 silver anniversary of the group. Since then the association has been helping the school-based members financially for their production and marketing of their show. “This year, our assistance to TNT school-based and to our alumni will now include livelihood and medical assistance and we are also launching very soon our scholarship grant to deserving school-based or TNT alumni dependents,” said Onor.

The anniversary night paid tribute to the 1986 founding members of TNT and also bestowed a posthumous recognition to Mark Anthony Legaspi for his contribution and dedication in TNT; the award was received by his brother John. The event also announced TNT’s 2016 recipients of the Eduardo Alcalde Achievement Awards: María Vicenta Medina, United Nations (UN) volunteer for war-torn countries, and;  Adel Argüel, professional stage actress and senior artist of The Art Production. Pásig Congressman Román Rómulo provided the keynote speech while GMA-7 artist Boobsie Wonderland gave a surprise performance for the TNT alumni crowd.

The TNT anniversary night was preceded by a weeklong exhibit held at the Adamson Cardinal Santos Walkway from February 1 to February 5, 2016.  The exhibit showcased various memorabilia and rare photo collections of the different productions and projects of TNT done in the last 30 years. The exhibit was formally opened by OIA – Director Eva Dulay, TNT Alumni President Teri Onor, and TNT alumna and Showtime Kalokalike 2013 Grand Winner Jenny Catuyong.

“The presence of TNT in Adamson is a testament of the University’s holistic student formation that is not limited only to excellent academic programs, but also takes care of the different facets of student interest, such in our case the performing arts” according to TNT alumni public relations officer, Allan Catli.

Learn more about the upcoming productions and projects of Tinik ng Teatro; visit their Facebook fansite at www.facebook.com/TinikNgTeatroAduOfficial.

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L-R: TNT Exhibit Week Opening at the Adamson University Cardinal Santos Walkway with Celebrity Impersonator Jenny Catuyon, TNT Alumni officers Teri Onor, Olive Deveza, OIA Director Eva Dulay, and TNT Alumni officer Adrian Ugali.

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Pasig City Congressman Roman Romulo giving his keynote address to the TNT Alumni Association.

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TNT Alumni Association President Dexter Dominguez a.k.a. Teri Onor delivering his plans and programs for the alumni association and the school-based members of TNT in Adamson University.

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l-r: HGST VP for HR and wife of the late Eduardo “Ed” Alcalde, Maryann Alcalde; star builder, owner of The Library, Andrew Real, and; TNT alumni officer, professional stage actress, Adel Arguel, 2016 Ed Alcalde Achievement Awardee. Inset: digital image of TNT’s revered director and mentor, Eduardo Alcalde.

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L-R: Maryann Alcalde (HGST VP for Human Resources), Maria Vicenta Medina (TNT 2016 Eduardo Alcalde Achievement Awardee), and star builder Andrew de Real.

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Teri Onor hands a posthumous recognition to John Legaspi on behalf of his late brother Mark Anthony Legaspi, former TNT Alumni president.

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Celebrity guest Boobsie Wonderland with TNT alumnus Jvee Amper.

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TNT Alumni unite! L-R: Hon. Mon Arguelles (Imus City councilor) and couple Jing and Allan Catli (Allphones Head of Marketing Services) with their baby boy Connor.

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Timeless neoclassical thespians of TNT, stronger and bolder than ever, celebrating 30 years of stage excellence in Adamson University!

Battle For Manila: we will never forget

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“It was Yank and Jap together that razed Intramuros. A dual crime.”
—Nick Joaquín—

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A US battle tank gratuitously bores a hole through the gates of Fuerte de Santiago, Intramuros during the closing days of the war. This heartbreaking photo was taken exactly 71 years ago today.

Happy eighth anniversary, TOF!

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Ivan Man Dymyself, Karl Ace, Paula O, and Traveler On Foot (photo taken by Traveler’s son Joaquín). Click here for more photos of our celebration!

 

I said it before, and I’ll say it again: Traveler on Foot may not be as popular as other Filipino bloggers out there, but it can never be denied that he is one of the pillars of Filipino travel blogging. And you don’t just travel with him (and his son): you get educated along the way!

Congratulations on your eighth year!

Happy 2016, folks!

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Learn from past mistakes in order to build a better future. Let us make 2016 a meaningful one. Happy New Year! And may God bless and guide us all!

2015 Filipino Of The Year — AlDub!

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After a year of absence, FILIPINO eSCRIBBLES is bringing back its much-awaited, mind-boggling, and world-famous Filipino of the Year award!

For this year, we give this award to (drum roll)…

Eat Bulaga’s Kalyeserye cast!

Click right here to find out why. Advanced Happy New Year to this blog’s BILLIONS of readers!😀

*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*

A list of past Filipino of the Year winners (and never mind one peculiar name there; I was duped).

2014: None
2013: Fr. Jojo Zerrudo
2012: Jesse Robredo
2011: All Filipinos
2010: Noynoy Aquino
2009: All Filipinos

Happy Birthday, Lord Jesus Christ!

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Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men.
~Luke 2:14~

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Image courtesy of xcntrc mind.

But Jon Royeca still has to CATEGORICALLY define what a Filipino is

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Before I begin, I would like to apologize to Jon Royeca for not having responded immediately to his blogpost last September 13 which was his reply to my “Clarifying a misconception on the definition of ‘Filipino’” article because I’m still reeling from all this AlDub craze that’s sweeping the country (and, bit by bit, the world). Thankfully, Lola Nidora is now OK with Bae Alden and Yaya Dub seeing each other without any hindrance, so I believe this is the “tamang panahón” to answer him back.

By hinting that what I did last time was amateurish, I guess I have to be less courteous this time: the gist of Royeca’s understanding of the term Filipino is SHALLOW, I’m very sorry to say (I say this not to insult him; he simply inspired me to be frank). It’s as if he has already boxed himself to the shock of having encountered something “new”, i.e., Fr. Pedro Chirino’s definition of the word Filipino. There is more to it than that. But let’s first begin with his belittling of my use of Luis Rodríguez Varela’s poem “Qué Todos Seamos Buenos Filipinos“.

Royeca claims that “poems belong to the ambit of creative literature” and that “they can be purely fictional”. He “respectfully” added:

And so utilizing them as a source for one bold historical claim—like the peninsulares were the original Filipinos—is an amateurish and slapdash crack at historiography.

The above statement is merely his opinion, and I have to respect that no matter how condescending he may have sounded. Nevertheless, Rodríguez Varela’s poem was very much straight to the point. If only Royeca had an inkling of my language (Spanish), he should have realized that Rodríguez Varela made no hidden meanings in that poem. There were no ambiguities, no symbolisms, nor any other unfathomable forms of poetic diction. What you see is what you get.

Los primeros filipinos, vasallos son de Felipe. The first Filipinos were the vassals of King Felipe II.

These were Miguel López de Legazpi and those peninsular Spaniards, both military and friar, who were with him, who opted to stay here and die here. In effect, they ceased to become Spaniards. They became Felipenos or those who saw King Felipe II as their sovereign (in the same vein that the vassals of Carlos XI of Sweden were called Carolinos, the vassals of King Fernando VII Fernandinos, and so on and so forth).

Also, it is unfair to limit a historian to focus only on documents that have nothing to do with literature. Take, for example, a historian who wants to know more about the moods and sentiments of Filipino intellectuals towards the US invasion and occupation of Filipinas. Don’t tell me that the anti-US poetry of Claro M. Recto (“Oración Al Dios Apolo”), Cecilio Apóstol (“Al Yankee“), Jesús Balmori (“A Blasco Ibáñez“), and a host of others cannot be used as research material just because they “belong to the ambit of creative literature” (Royeca’s words).

And when I challenged Royeca to “point out any indigenous individual who called himself a Filipino during the Spanish times”, he answered back with “Jose (sic) Rizal and his fellow natives” which is, to borrow his words, a colossal blunder. The fact that I wrote indigenous individual in bold type and even underlined it is to emphasize something. Because, for sure, José Rizal was NOT an indigenous. He was a native of Filipinas but he was certainly NOT an indigenous individual.

To wit: indigenous and native may be slightly synonymous but are completely two different things. I am a native of Parañaque City but I’m certainly NOT an indigenous individual.

I trust that the historian in Royeca did no amateurish or slapdash crack in the comprehension of simple historical terms that experts like him should already know.

But Royeca, for FAILING to CATEGORICALLY define what a Filipino is, simply opted to beat around the bush. Nevertheless, I should not be too hard on him even if he belittled my use of poetry as a source material. After all, he has already boxed himself to the shock of encountering Fr. Chirino’s definition of Filipino. So I’ll just let him enjoy this refractory period of his.

Remember, boys and girls: declaring a historical evidence to the public to point out something is not enough. It always has to be interpreted with a good amount of critical thinking. And to end this, Royeca (and his partner Nonoy Regalado) should understand that IDENTITY has to stand on what you call YOURSELF and not what others CALL YOU.

AlDub You all,

Bae Pepe

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