RSS Feed

Category Archives: Bahay Na Bató

Incredible longevity for a “Filipina at heart”

Posted on

Jessie Lichauco at 98: Feasting by the Pásig, dances with memories

When someone asked the “Birthday Girl” to dance, her fair skin almost blushed and a dreamy look came over her gray-green eyes. She said, “thank you, but I am dancing with my memories.”

Together with a hundred guests of all ages and from all corners of life, Jessie Lichauco celebrated her 98th birthday last Jan. 10.

Talented 7-year-old Hannah sang the Philippine National Anthem in the garden of an ancient home along the Pasig River. Tita Jessie then personally greeted each guest with an energetic smile and spry movements, her ageless body moving in rhythm with the live big-band music provided by The Executives, whose selection of music from days gone by provided backdrop to the ever-flowing conversation.

Each friend or relative was there because this lady had left an unforgettable imprint on their lives.

Larry Henares recounts, “When my wife Cecilia died of a sudden heart attack while we were in Paris, I was so devastated that I could not bear the thought of telling my children about their mother’s death. The first thing I did was call Tita Jessie—I knew she would know the best way to tell them and comfort them at the same time.”

Jessie Lichauco with her granddaughter Sunshine de León (standing). Jessie is the wife of the late diplomat and historian Marcial Lichauco. She can be a good source of oral history because, despite her age, her memory is still sharp!

Curiosity, adventure, love

When Jessie Lichauco, my grandmother, first came to the Philippines in 1933, she was 18 years old. The population of the country was 8 million, and many people still traveled in horse-drawn carriages.

She became the wife, and later the widow, of lawyer-diplomat Marcial P. Lichauco. Her life during the past 76 years has allowed Jessie to witness and interact with people, places and events that make up a large part of Philippine history. She has seen the country at its best and worst. And although she is part Irish-Scottish-Cuban-Spanish on the outside, her heart is unquestionably Filipino.

Why did she embark on that 28-day ship voyage from America to the Philippines? She has always answered, “Curiosity, adventure and love.”

Watching her celebrate with the people she has befriended since her life’s journey began 8 decades ago, there is no doubt she continues to live with those three ideals in mind. Age has never prevented her from engaging every adventurous moment life offers her.

Many people have asked her what the “secret recipe” is to living long and appearing so much younger than she is. The answer is less likely found in following a particular diet or health program (other than fresh buko juice daily, very little meat or chicken, and no coffee, alcohol or smoking) than on certain guidelines for living.

The secret is simply in the way she views the world and lives her life, which allows her to remain so actively involved in it.

“I am at the age of self-preservation,” my grandmother says. “I don’t worry about things over which I have no control.”

She points out that stress of any kind goes through your mind and can affect your body. “You always have a choice—to be a grouchy old person or take life as it comes. I often tell young people that having a sense of humor is very important. Sometimes you think things are insurmountable. There is nothing you can do but accept it and move forward.”

Click here for more.

Related link:
Down the River (WITH ONE’S PAST)

Back from Unisan / Calilayan

Posted on

We’re home!

Momay and I arrived just a few hours ago from our Unisan excursion. I’ll blog about it soon here and in ALAS FILIPINAS.

I was also looking for closure about what happened to me there more than three years ago. To be honest, I was even expecting rejection from some of its people. But it turned out that I’m not that “infamous” anymore, LOL! Nobody noticed me, save from the same pigs like SPO3 Danny Medina. Arnaldo and I were apprehended by the police on suspicion of being communist spies. But unlike what happened between police pig Medina and I three years ago, they were a bit cordial. They explained their “paranoia”, as well as the dangers posed by the communist insurgency in my dad’s hometown. “Very dangerous” indeed.

Also, I’m saddened about cases of illegal logging. One of my cousins confessed to me about the rampant logging that’s been going on there. I’ll also write about the worsening water pollution in Unisan.

And last but not the least, I’ll also write about the sad state of the idyllic and nostalgic Antilean houses (bahay na bató) in Unisan.

I regret to say this, but after three years, what I saw in Unisan only reaffirmed my stand. And it’s not just a “very dangerous” place to visit (as implied by the statement of the town’s police chief himself) — Unisan is not worth a tourist’s precious time. =(

At least, there’s Cueva de Bonifacio, but it’s several miles away from the población.

Till next time.

Calilayan

Posted on

I’m at the office right now. Our shift ends at 7:00 AM. Afterwards, we go to Unisan, Quezon, my father’s hometown.

With me are my son Momay (my father’s favorite grandchild; he took care of him when he was still an infant) and fellow propagandist (and officemate) Arnaldo Arnáiz. Señor Guillermo Gómez Rivera was supposed to be with us, but declined at the last minute because of a very important meeting with some people from the Spanish Embassy. Popular blogger Traveler On Foot also couldn’t make it.

The mission: to take pictures of the town’s remaining bahay na bató before they are all obliterated into oblivion. And in that town, it’s highly possible. A heinous act was made on the Maxino mansion, said to be Unisan’s oldest bahay na bató, a few years ago. Recently, I heard that the Vera Cruz house was demolished as well (I hope it’s not true).

I first took pictures of old houses there back in December of 2006 with my sister Jennifer. The trip resulted in a very controversial blogpost when I was still writing for Skirmisher. It’s because I was harrassed by a certain SPO3 Danny Medina and other police pigs.

The digital camera I used belonged to my siblings. I left Unisan without being able to have the photos developed. I just told my mom that I’d get them soon. A few weeks later, I heard that she lent the photos to one of my dad’s cousins (an Évora) who brought them to the US. I never heard of the photos since then.

Sayang. Those photos were awesome. I’ve taken pictures of all the remaining bahay na bató, including those that were already abandoned. I hope that I could still see them. But I can never be sure.

That’s why I have to do this again. Take pictures of the town, document it in my blogs, write a brief history about it.

It’s 2010. I also need some closure to what had transpired back in 2006.

Generally, Unisan –called Calilayan a long time ago– is not really a dangerous place to visit.

Disappointment over my unofficial hometown

Posted on

Fulfilling what I wrote yesterday, I went around San Pedro, La Laguna, tagging along mi única hija Krystal. It was also a baptism of fire of sorts for our new camera (although we already used it on Christmas Day). I’ll blog about it when I feel OK already (I’m so exhausted with all that walking under the afternoon sun!); hopefully tomorrow. I still haven’t mastered how to use the camera correctly, nor have I accustomed myself with its special features. That’s why I won’t be surprised if the pictures don’t come out OK.

I’ve been around San Pedro numerous times already. We’ve been living here for the past five years. We moved here last 10 November 2004, on the very day of the 2004 Philippine National Elections (that’s when FPJ won in the voting but got lost in the counting). Yeyette was then heavy with child (three days later, she gave birth to Momay, on the feast of Our Lady of Fatima). A female cousin of mine who was married to a San Pedrense helped us in finding a place to stay. Those were struggling times for us. Indeed, getting married at a very inopportune time will not do a person any good, especially in this age of economic crises.

When we first moved here, I was really excited. I’ve been an urban kid for years. That’s why rural life always revs up the sentient patterns of my behavior toward society. Summer vacations in Unisan, Quezon during my childhood made it even more nostalgic.

In short, I’m sick of urban life.

But as soon as I stepped inside the world of San Pedro, La Laguna back in 2004, I was immediately disappointed. I was expecting some farmlands, tranquility, more of nature, more rustic imagery, more bahay na bató. But upon entrance (from Muntinlupà City), what greeted me was a vandalized bridge and welcome arch, a garbage-filled estero, Sogo Hotel, smoke fumes from numerous tricycles, boorish traffic, and a motley assemblage of unaesthetic establishments reminiscent of Quiapò, Manila. It was an exuberance of poor municipal planning.

San Pedro, La Laguna is reputedly the “Sampaguita Capital of the Philippines”. But I saw no Sampaguita. Beerhouses, however, were not wanting. And should I even mention the garbage?! And that poor thing called a river…!

But it’s the Christmas season. I shouldn’t be writing about horrible things. I’m just disappointed. It appears that the “curse” of cityhood has encroached rural territories.

San Pedro’s deterioration is not the local government’s fault alone. The people are to be blamed as well. The first thing that you notice in a place is its cleanliness (or filthiness, whichever comes first). With San Pedro, you’ll immediately run into filth. It’s funny how its people continuously complain of the government’s inaction against garbage when they themselves litter everywhere as if there’s no tomorrow.

And lastly, where are the cultural sites? The province of La Laguna is supposed to be a tourist destination. The last time I checked, San Pedro is still in La Laguna.

This afternoon, Krystal and I took pictures of San Pedro’s major sites. But it’s still disappointing. There’s really nothing much to see in San Pedro. No offense to our family friend, San Pedro Mayor Calixto Catáquiz, but I used to kid around that San Pedro is the “ugliest place in La Laguna province”. I know it sounds rude. But it appears to be true. And I say that not really to insult but out of helpless disappointment.

Mayor Calex has a lot of work to do if his reelection bid becomes successful in the upcoming 2010 Philippine National Elections. His vision 2020 for San Pedro is astounding, almost too good to be true. In his still unpublished biography, A Date With Destiny
(One More Challenge!): The Life Story of San Pedro, Laguna Mayor Calixto R. Catáquiz
(which Arnaldo and I are still working on), San Pedro writer Sonny Ordoña has this to share:

“Mayor Catáquiz is a visionary,” says Sonny Ordoña, the town’s resident historian and the municipal hall’s consultant for cultural affairs. “Once he asked me for a unique nickname for the town. Since we have a couple of shrines here, particularly the miraculous Santo Sepulcro Shrine in Landayan, I suggested to him, ‘well, why not dub it as a Shrine City?’ His eyes beamed with the idea. The next thing you know, he’s telling everyone that he’s planning to create a 30-storey high bronze statue of Jesus Christ! He wants it installed up in the mountains of San Pedro!”

Also mentioned in this still unpublished biography:

Another pet project of his is quite ambitious: to redevelop idle parts of San Pedro into an economic zone — a trading convergence zone for products coming in from Southern and Northern Luzón!

“Through this economic zone, traders and farmers from Southern Tagalog, and even the whole of Southern Philippines, will be able to sell and showcase their native produce and other items in San Pedro. At the same time, Filipino businessmen from the North will be able to do the same. Thus, this setup will definitely make San Pedro a crucial business zone, making its nickname as the Gateway to Calabarzon truly worthy!”

I’m not sure if Mayor Calex is still interested in having his biography published. We haven’t seen nor talked to each other for about a month or so. The book’s 99.99% done. Gemma Cruz Araneta has even reviewed it already. And Arnaldo is now busy with other historical projects. Furthermore, we’ll be moving out of this town next year. For good. If Mayor Calex isn’t interested anymore, we’ll just charge it to experience.

Anyway, with the way things are going around in San Pedro –my “unofficial” hometown– it looks as if Mayor Calex still has a long way to go with regard to his noble Vision 2020 plans.

Pero cahit anó pa man, napamahál na rin sa aming familia ang pueblo na itó. Five years is five years. We’ve had many good memories in this town named after Saint Peter the Apostle.

Por la intercesión del San Pedro Apóstol, que el Señor Dios le bendiga a este pueblo.

*******

Happy birthday, Mayor Catáquiz!

Best filipino ancestral houses (Traveler On Foot)

Posted on

For today, I feature my online comrade Traveler On Foot’s choice photo collections of all the bahay na bató that he has visited in Luzón. Please click here to view these awesome Filipino houses.

A blast from the past! (Taal, Batangas)

Posted on

Aside from the old town of Vigan in Ilocos Sur (and perhaps Intramuros de Manila), the municipality of Taal has the highest concentration of well-preserved Antillean houses locally known as the bahay na bató, a mixture of pre-Filipino (or before the foundation of our country), Spanish, and Chinese architectural influences. The town is very fortunate for not being razed to the ground by both Japanese and American forces during the last world war. And this is perhaps due to the intervention of the town’s patron saint, Martín de Tours (whose image is housed inside the mighty interiors of the Basílica de San Martín de Tours), and also of Our Lady of Caysasay.

Last October 5 (Monday morning), Arnaldo and I went to Taal. Despite a looming low blood pressure, I just have to take that trip. Haven’t done much traveling and “field work” for a long, long time. We were unfortunate, though, to find out that most famous houses there which are now museums are closed on Mondays. That’s why we don’t have photos of some of the houses’ interiors. Drats.

It was my second time in Taal. The first time I was there was when I was still a college brat. Me and my Parañaque homies were just passing by on our way to Lemery to party and swim and get drunk. I didn’t care much about local history back then. And so this time around, I was prepared for one of the grandest moments of my life — a walk through time, a blast from the past!

Walking along the old streets of Taal reminded me of other centuries-old Filipino homes across the country. Many of them are already neglected. And every year, many of them are nonchalantly brought down to the ground to give way to the new (what price modernization!).

Here in Taal, the people take pride of their town’s rich cultural past. The people are wise enough to preserve their homes not just for posterity but for the sake of income-generating tourism. If only other towns follow Taal’s initiative, not only will they give their own people rewarding jobs, they would also help conserve remnants of our Filipino Identity.

I once tried to do the same for Unisan, Quezon, my father’s hometown. Some houses there could rival the beauty and architecture of those in Taal. But I failed, no thanks to hooligans in uniform.

I hope that the national government will do something to spread the conservationist stance of Taal. After all, to borrow from renowned conservationist Augusto Villalón, heritage conservation is everyone’s business.

Without further kalamazoo, here are the photos we took of that wonderful Hispanic town in Batangas — Taal!!!

A neighborhood of history and charm...

A neighborhood of history and charm...

HISTORICAL MARKER OF TAAL, BATANGAS AT THE MUNICIPAL HALL

Taal, Batangas

NATIONAL HISTORICAL COMMISSION, 1972

ANG BAYAN NG TAAL (1572)

UNANG ITINATAG SA POOK NG BALANGON NOONG 1572. DAHIL SA MADALAS NA PAGPUTOK NG BULKAN AY INILIPAT ANG BAYAN SA KASALUKUYANG POOK. NAGING KABISERA NOONG 1732 KAYA’T TAAL ANG IPINANGALAN SA BUONG LALAWIGAN. NANG MULING MASIRA ANG BAYAN DAHIL SA PAGPUTOK NG BULKAN NOONG 1754, ANG KABISERA AY INILIPAT SA BATANGAN AT ISINUNOD DITO ANG PANGALAN NG LALAWIGAN. ANG BULKAN NG TAAL, NA PINAKAMALIIT SA BUONG DAIGDIG, AY NSA GITNA NG LAWA NG BONBON AT SA BUNGANGA NG BULKAN AY MAY ISANG PULONG NASA ISA PANG MALIIT NA LAWA. PUMUTOK ANG BULKAN NOONG 1634, 1635, 1641, 1709, 1718, 1729, 1731, 1749, 1754, 1867, 1874, 1880, 1911 AT 1965. ANG NGAYO’Y MGA BAYAN NG LEMERY, SAN LUIS, AGONCILLO, SAN NICOLAS, AT STA. TERESITA AY DATING SAKOP NG TAAL.

Ventanas cerradas: the curse of modernization seems not to be welcome among these houses.

Ventanas cerradas: the curse of modernization seems not to be welcome among these houses.

To the local government of Taal: please save this Filipino house!

To the local government of Taal: please save this Filipino house!

This one didn't get lucky...

This one didn't get lucky...

One part of this house (near the municipal hall) is converted into a small school.

One part of this house (near the municipal hall) is converted into a small school.

Philippine baroque: adobe ground floor; wooden second floor projecting over the sidewalk -- classic bahay-na-bató design!

Philippine baroque: adobe ground floor; wooden second floor projecting over the sidewalk -- classic bahay-na-bató design!

An 18th-century house converted into a small hotel under the auspices of the Taal Heritage Foundation.

An 18th-century house converted into a small hotel under the auspices of the Taal Heritage Foundation.

Cute cubed casita.

Cute cubed casita.

Many Taal houses have opened shops on their stone-built ground floors such as this one.

Many Taal houses have opened shops on their stone-built ground floors such as this one.

Arnold said it's a house. I think it's a bodega. But we're not really sure. Whatever it is, it's still exquisite to our eyes, a historic Taal edifice.

Arnold said it's a house. I think it's a bodega. But we're not really sure. Whatever it is, it's still exquisite to our eyes, a historic Taal edifice.

An amalgam of old and new.

An amalgam of old and new.

There is no street in Taal where there are no classic Filipino houses.

There is no street in Taal where there are no classic Filipino houses.

A well-maintained bahay-na-bató.

A well-maintained bahay-na-bató.

Taal town still uses CALLE instead of STREET! Awesome! A job well done for preserving something that is very Filipino!

Taal town still uses CALLE instead of STREET! Awesome! A job well done for preserving something that is very Filipino!

Historical marker at the ancestral home of Doña Marcela Mariño de Agoncillo, the principal seamstress of the first and official Philippine flag.

Historical marker at the ancestral home of Doña Marcela Mariño de Agoncillo, the principal seamstress of the first and official Philippine flag.


PHILIPPINE HISTORICAL COMMITTEE 1955

MARCELA MARIÑO DE AGONCILLO 1859-1946

IPINANGANAK SA TAAL 24 HUNYO 1859; NAG-ARAL SA KOLEHIYO NG SANTA CATALINA; ASAWA NI FELIPE AGONCILLO AT SIYA NIYANG MATAPAT NA KATULONG SA KANYANG MGA GAWAING MAKABAYAN; IPINAGBILI ANG KANYANG MGA HIYAS UPANG MAGUGOL NG ASAWA SA MISYON NITO SA IBANG BANSA SA KAPAKANAN NG PAGSASARILI NG PILIPINAS. SA PANAHON NG KANILANG PAGKAPATAPON SA HONG KONG, AY TINAHI NIYA ANG UNANG BANDILANG PILIPINO NA BUONG PAGMAMALAKING IWINAGAYWAY NI HENERAL AGUINALDO SA KAWIT NOONG 12 HUNYO 1898 SA PAGPAPAHAYAG NG PAGSASARILI NG PILIPINAS. NAMATAY SA TAAL 30 MAYO 1946.

A row of Barong Tagalog stalls at the public market.

A row of Barong Tagalog stalls at the public market.

We had Lomi for lunch at the mercado público!

We had Lomi for lunch at the mercado público!

This arch is a disappointment. The carved text should've been written either in Spanish or Tagalog to preserve the town's historicity.

This arch is a disappointment. The carved text should've been written either in Spanish or Tagalog to preserve the town's historicity.


THE ANCESTRAL HOME OF ANANIAS DIOKNO

The home of one of Taal’s local heroes, Ananias Diokno, is a sad story. The place is already decrepit, and the second floor can even be destroyed by ten men’s bare hands within minutes. What’s ironic is that there is a historical marker placed on the house’s first floor exterior wall, implying that the place is taken care of by local authorities. Hopefully, this house will still be preserved for posterity.

The ancestral home of Ananias Diokno (un taaleño revolucionario).

The ancestral home of Ananias Diokno (un taaleño revolucionario).

Ananias Diokno historical marker.

Ananias Diokno historical marker.

NATIONAL HISTORICAL INSTITUTE, 1991

ANANIAS DIOKNO

KILALA SA TAGURING HENERAL NG KARAGATAN. IPINANGANAK SA TAAL, BATANGAS, ENERO 22, 1860. NAGING KALIHIM NG DIGMA SA PAMAHALAANG PANGKAGAWARAN NG BATANGAS, 1898; NAMUMUNONG HENERAL NG HUKBONG EKSPEDISYUNARYO NG PANAY; MATAGUMPAY NA NAKIPAGLABAN SA BALWARTE NG MGA KASTILA SA AKLAN, ANTIQUE, CAPIZ AT LUNGSOD NG ILOILO; GOBERNADOR PAMPULITIKO-MILITAR NG CAPIZ. LUMAHOK SA PAKIKIPAGLABAN NG MGA GERILYA NOONG DIGMAANG PILIPINO AT AMERIKANO SA CAPIZ, 1898. NAKIPAGLABAN AT NADAKIP NG MGA AMERIKANO SA MAY BUNDOK MAKAWIWILI, AKLAN, 1901. NAMATAY SA ARAYAT, PAMPANGA, NOBYEMBRE 2, 1922.

THE ANCESTRAL HOME OF LEÓN APACIBLE

LEÓN APACIBLE ANCESTRAL HOME

The ancestral home of León Apacible. Rizal and other propagandists have been to this house.

*******

MARÍA YLAGAN OROSA – FABIÁN DE LA ROSA ANCESTRAL HOUSE

YLAGAN - DE LA ROSA

Historical marker of the Ylagan - de la Rosa ancestral house

YLAGAN - DE LA ROSA 2

YLAGAN - DE LA ROSA

*******

BASÍLICA DE SAN MARTÍN DE TOURS

Basílica de Saint Martín de Tours

Basílica de Saint Martín de Tours

For years, I’ve been hearing a lot about the old church in Taal which is situated on a high hill, and about the Virgin of Caysasay. I’ve always thought that this miraculous image is housed in that same old church on top of the hill. So when Arnaldo and I arrived in Taal and saw the massive structure of the church, I thought that it was the Church of Caysasay. But the natives told me otherwise.

Pardon my ignorance, dear readers. So the Church of Taal and the Church of Caysasay are two different churches after all.

The Church of Taal is officially known as the Basílica de San Martín de Tours, the largest church in all of Asia! It stands 96 meters long and 45 meters wide. It was the Augustinian Missionaries who initiated the construction of this “magnificent monstrosity” way back in 1856. Even today, modern architecture might still find it difficult to build such a structure. So you could just imagine the kind of architectural and masonic genius our forefathers (and Spanish architect Luciano Oliver) had —not to mention the dedication and faith— in creating such a stylish and grand structure for God and Christianity and its people in this quaint and bucolic town of Taal.

As stated in the town’s historical marker, Taal used to be in a different site. The Taal basilica was first built in present day San Nicolás, Batangas under the care of Fray Diego Espina, O.S.A. in 1575. But in 1754, nearby Volcán de Bonbón (the onomatopoeical ancient name of Taal Volcano) erupted so violently it destroyed not only the original church but the whole town of Taal itself. The church was then transferred to its present site, the Taal that we know today.

A new land was prepared for the new church in 1755, but in 1849 it was destroyed again, this time by an earthquake. Construction of the new church began in 1856 and lasted up to 1878. A small tower was made on the church’s left side but it was destroyed during the Japanese Occupation. It was reconstructed later on, much taller than the original.

It was only during the previous generation when this historic church was made into a basilica: 8 December 1954, feast day of the Immaculate Conception; it was later declared as a national shrine on 16 January 1974.

When Arnaldo and I went there last October 5, it was a windy Monday afternoon (my favorite weather!). My clothes were flapping on my thin frame, and the winds were bouncing heavily on the weather-beaten façade as it howled onto my ears. I stood right in front of the massive structure, looking straight up. The sentiment of that moment was something undescribable. Something which curdles the blood nostalgic.

It was something else — something that is purely and spiritually FILIPINO…

We then entered the church, eyes gaping at the imposing ceilings of this granddaddy of all Batangas churches.

I would have embraced the whole structure if I were Galactus of Marvel Comics.

So far, this is the most beautiful and awe-inspiring church these pretty eyes have laid on!

The massive façade of the largest church in Asia.

The massive façade of the largest church in Asia.

Guardian.

Guardian.

The church's imposing interiors.

The church's imposing interiors.

SAINT MARTÍN DE TOURS

ESCUELA PÍA

Founded by Augustinians, this small edifice is one of the oldest educational institutions in the country: Escuela Pía (since 1839).

PEPE ALAS EN LA BASÍLICA DE SAN MARTÍN DE TOURS

Nope. Not Europe -- Batangas!

*******

NUESTRA SEÑORA DE CAYSASAY

The church which houses the 17th-century gem -- Nuestra Señora de Caysasay.

The church which houses the 17th-century gem -- Nuestra Señora de Caysasay.

The chapel-like Church of Caysasay is a stark contrast to the giant that is the Basílica de San Martín de Tours. Caysasay Church is located in the outskirts of the town, standing beside Río de Pansipit. The famous icon of Nuestra Señora de Caysasay, a 17th-century image of the Immaculate Conception, is housed there. The image was discovered by a Taaleño fisherman named Juan Maningcad in 1603. Up to now, nobody knows the origins of the miraculous image. There have been even reports of apparitions of the Blessed Virgin Mary on the hill of Barrio Caysasay. The Blessed Mother of Christ appeared on the same spot where the Church of Caysasay now stands.

The historic and miraculous image of Our Lady of Caysasay.

The historic and miraculous image of Our Lady of Caysasay.

The simply-designed retablo of the centuries-old Church of Caysasay.

The simply-designed retablo of the centuries-old Church of Caysasay.

Nuestra Señora de Caysasay

*******

The ancestral home of Don Gregorio R. Agoncillo.

The ancestral home of Don Gregorio R. Agoncillo.

OUR HERITAGE SPEAKS SO MUCH OF OUR IDENTITY. CONSERVATION SPEAKS SO MUCH OF OUR LOVE AND RESPECT FOR OUR OWN IDENTITY.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 779 other followers

%d bloggers like this: