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Category Archives: Arts

2014 Grants Program for Cultural Heritage in Spain

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The call for applications for the Grants Program for Cultural Heritage organized by Fundación ENDESA, in cooperation with the Department of Culture of the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport of Spain is now open. Citizens from Latin American countries, Puerto Rico, Equatorial Guinea and the Philippines, where Spanish language is constitutionally recognized, are eligible to apply.

The Embassy of Spain is inviting Filipino graduates with C1 level of Spanish language to apply for one of the nine grants offered by Fundación ENDESA. Successful applicants will gain experience and trainings in the field of cultural heritage through internship in various cultural institutions in Spain.

Application forms must be sent by post not later than April 4, 2014 and must be electronically transmitted before April 3, 2014, 7pm (Spain Time).

For further details and application guidelines, interested applicants may visit the official website.

Download the grant guidelines.

Text taken from the National Commission for Culture and the Arts.

NCCA’s “Bloggers’ Hour”: Philippine Arts Festival 2014 — Art on the Edge

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It’s all systems go for this year’s National Arts Month!

In preparation for the upcoming Philippine Arts Festival (PAF), the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA) held its second “Bloggers’ Hour” last Thursday in its headquarters in Intramuros, Manila. The first Bloggers’ Hour was two years ago wherein I signed up as ALAS FILIPINAS. The blogpost I wrote for it was largely ignored in this wonderful country of ours because it was written in Spanish. Although I was hoping to grab the attention of the Spanish-speaking community overseas, it was not a clever move if I had wanted a Filipino audience. Actually, I didn’t. But never mind that. Anyway. This time around, I signed up as the Filipino eScribbler. And yes, I bet this pretty blogpost of mine will garner thousands of hits. Because the NCCA said so.

Last Thursday, me and other fellow bloggers who attended the simple gathering were informed about the upcoming events for the PAF 2014. The PAF is a month-long celebration held every February in time for the National Arts Month which was created by virtue of some presidential decree which nobody has ever heard of. This year, the event will start from January 31 up to March 3.

PAF 2014 will have a “soft opening” later this morning. At exactly 8:00 AM, there will be a flash mob of various artists coupled with performances by hip hop, ballet, and Filipiniana dancers at the Doroteo José station of the Light Railway Transit in Manila. It will be followed by another one at the Metro Railway Transit’s Cubáo station in Quezon City at 10:00 AM. So slackers who plan to be late for work will have a pretty good excuse: “I was mobbed by people with fancy Bohemian clothing, and they were armed with paintbrushes, chisels, and they were talking smack verses! I was totally helpless, boss!”

I’m supposed to be there later but I couldn’t because I haven’t slept yet since yesterday morning, and I’m still wide awake listening to the howling Siberian winds outside, and it’s close to 4:00 AM as I write this, and I have a thousand other lame excuses. But I think the ever-reliable blogger Gemma San José will be there to blog about it. So stay tuned to her blog Lifelong Learning. And yes, her latest blogpost has just saved me (and probably the other bloggers) from further explaining in detail what the highly informative NCCA Chairman Felipe de León, Jr. spoke about during last Thursday’s Bloggers’ Hour. Snippets of his absorbing impromptu speech about Filipino Identity and the arts can be viewed from Hoshi‘s video below:

And yes, that pretty boy to the right of the video is me. Talicogenic pa rin.

NCCA’s Bloggers’ Hour may not be as huge as other blogger events, but I am still honored to be part of it nonetheless especially since it is organized by the country’s bastion of —what else?— culture and the arts.

Hey. It would be nice if you’d get rid of that humdrum existence of yours once in a while. Or even for just a month. Let February do that for you. It’s National Arts Month, and art is on the edge. Better be there when it happens. As they say over at the NCCA, “Halina’t maqui-sining“. It’s guaranteed to get funky and fun. :D

Click here for more photos of Bloggers’ Hour. You may also visit PAF’s Facebook page by clicking here.

The stolen image of the infant Jesus of Betis has finally been recovered!

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Official Statement of the Archdiocesan Commission on Church Heritage (ACCH) – Archdiocese of San Fernando on the Recovery of the Stolen Image of the Infant Jesus of Betis
*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*
The image of Betis Church’s Infant Jesus that was taken from Virgen de la Correa’s embrace in the afternoon of 30 December 2013 has been recovered with the help of renowned ecclesiastical art restorer Thomas Joven.

Joven, who heads the Parish Pastoral Council of San Guillermo Parish of Bacolor and who also serves as member of the Tangible Heritage Committee of ACCH, reported his find to diocesan church authorities as the image surfaced in the antiques market, days after it was reported to be missing.

The Infant Jesus was stolen as the Betis community was celebrating its parish fiesta. Ivory parts of the image (particularly the head, hands, and feet) went up for sale in the antiques market in Manila not long after. Joven intimates that he spent ₱167,000 to be able to retrieve and secure the image and is ready to turn it over any moment to the parish priest of Saint James Parish in Betis Church, Guagua. The image was handed to him in a small plastic bag minus the body and the hairpiece.

ACCH denounces the theft and trafficking of stolen religious icons and other church treasures. In recent years, this illegal trade has been carried out with alarming boldness and shamelessness. In cases like this, some unscrupulous entities are bound to make easy money. It is most unfortunate that they choose to ignore the fact that what make religious icons priceless and precious are the historical, cultural and spiritual meanings that Catholic devotees attach to such symbols of their faith.

ACCH commits itself to helping curb the illegal trade of stolen religious icons and other church treasures. We vow to cooperate with authorities to minimize the threat of losing more church goods to thieves. In this regard, we enjoin all parishes of the Archdiocese of San Fernando to:

1. Undertake a parish-wide inventory and documentation of all church goods and properties;
2. Institute security measures (e.g. installation of CCTV cameras/alarms or hiring of security guards) that can help deter theft of these goods;
3. Remind parishioners to be more vigilant in protecting the material treasures/tangible heritage of their respective parishes;

Our gratitude to antique collectors, media entities, netizens, heritage workers,and to everyone who offered leads and prayers, and who helped spread the word about the theft of the image.

The recovered ivory parts of the Niño Jesús del Virgen de la Correa of Betis with ecclesiastical art restorer Tom Joven who helped get back the image.

Photos and text from Most Rev. Pablo Virgilio S. David, D.D., Auxiliary Bishop of the Diocese of San Fernando.

My Tagalog translation of Lope de Vega’s “Varios Efectos del Amor

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This is my Tagalog translation of Lope de Vega’s “Varios Efectos del Amor” which I read in last Friday’s LIRIKO Musika+Salaysay, a cultural program that was held in Kape Kesada, Paeté, La Laguna.

Photography by Ronald A. Yu.

IBÁ’T-IBÁNG EFECTO NG PAG-IBIG
Pepe Alas

Pagcaualán ng malay, mapañgahas, magalit,
magaspáng, banayad, malayà, mailáp,
pagcagana ng loób, sucat macamatáy, patáy, buháy,
tapát, sucab, duág, masiglá,

Capág di mahanap ang náis, ualáng catahimican;
Nagmúmuqhang masayá, maluncót, mapagpacúmbabâ, mapágmataas,
nagagalit, matapang, palatanan,
nasísiyahan, nasásactan, naguiguing cahiná-hinalà,

Ang pagtalicod sa malinao na pagcacámalî,
uminóm ng lason na tila ba’y minatamís na alac,
ang pagcalimot sa paquinabang, at pagcaguilio sa pinsalà —

Ang maniuala na ang calañgitan ay maaaring pagcásiahin sa infierno,
Ang pag-alay ng buhay at cáloloa sa isáng malíng acalà,
Itó ang pag-ibig; ang sínumang nacalasáp nitó, alám ang sinasabi có.
.

Copyright © 2013
José Mario Alas
Manila, Philippines
All rights reserved.

Pardon my usage of “archaic” Tagalog. I am against useless and deliberate revisionism of languages and orthography.

Happy Valentine’s Day everyone!

New “Pepe Alas” page photo!

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Check out this blog’s “PEPE ALAS” page! It has a new image!

Special thanks to Mr. Gilbert Atento, cartoonist extraordinaire and a former colleague of mine from APAC Customer Services. For caricatures, send your inquiries to geelburt@gmail.com or you may contact him at (0905)963-1298. Just pay him a couple of peanuts and a beer! :D

I’m telling you, Gilbert can even do a bad@ss caricature of the famed Spoliarium. No kidding.

LA LAGUNA The Festival of Life (booths of towns and cities)

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LA LAGUNA The Festival of Life 2012. Featuring photos of all the beautifully decorated booths of each town and city of the cultural-conscious province of La Laguna (only Majayjay did not participate; I still have to find out why). Each booth showcases its respective town and city’s identity — products, festivities, cottage industries, and tourist attractions. So, without further adieu, feast your eyes on these…

First District

SAN PEDRO
The Sampaguita Capital of the Philippines

BIÑÁN
The Home of the Famous Puto Biñán

SANTA ROSA
The Lion City of the South

Second District

CABUYAO
The Town of the Legendary Golden Bell

CALAMBÂ
The Hometown of the National Hero

LOS BAÑOS
Special Science and Nature City of the Philippines

BAY
The First Capital of Laguna

Third District

VICTORIA
The Duck Raising Center of the Philippines

CALAUAN
Home of the Sweetest Pineapple

SAN PABLO
The City of Seven Lakes

ALAMINOS
The Home of the Coramblan Festival*

RIZAL
Tayak Adventure and Nature Park

NAGCARLÁN
Site of the Nagcarlán Underground Cemetery Historical Landmark

LILIW
The Footwear Capital of Laguna

Fourth District

PILA
La Noble Villa de Pila

SANTA CRUZ
The Capital of Laguna

MAGDALENA
The Bamboo Capital of Laguna

LUISIANA
The Pandán Capital of Laguna

CAVINTI
Laguna’s Ecotourism Capital

PAGSANJÁN
The Tourist Capital of Laguna

LUMBÁN
The Embroidery Capital of the Philippines

KALAYAAN
Laguna’s Symbol of Peace and Unity

PAETÉ
The Woodcarving Capital of the Philippines

PÁQUIL
Home of the Turumba Festival

PÁÑGUIL
Home of the Nuestra Señora de la O and the Santo Niño de la O

ñ

 

SINILÓAN
Waterfalls Sanctuary of Laguna

FAMY
The Home of Bamboo Weavers

MABITAC
The Site of the Fabled Battle of Mabitac

SANTA MARÍA
The Rice Granary of Laguna

Today, by the way, is the last day of festivities. Click here for the schedule. And for more of the festival’s day one (21 April 2012) photos, click here.

Congratulations to La Laguna Governor E.R. Ejército, his team, and to all Lagunenses for this splendid event!

*******

**COconut, RAMbután, and LANzones

“Bloggers’ Hour” at the NCCA

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The first ever "Bloggers' Hour" organized and hosted by the National Commission for Culture and the Arts.

FILIPINO eSCRIBBLES and ALAS FILIPINAS are honored to have attended the first ever “Bloggers’ Hour” this morning. The event was organized by the National Commission for Culture and the Arts. Click here for the story.

The perfect words to describe Mideo Cruz’s garbage

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For his somewhat immature and juvenile views regarding Philippine History, I don’t have a liking for F. Sionil José even if he’s one of the late, great Nick Joaquín‘s dearest friends. I may have a preference for José’s prose. I bought his famous Rosales novels as well as his other books, and I think they’re OK. But like I always say to other like-minded people, he’d better stick to fiction where he’s good at. Just like Ms. Bárbara González should stick to writing about the comforts of life.

But another thing that Mr. José may be good at aside from moulding fictitious characters and circumstances from his mind is art criticism. And this is what he has to say to describe Mideo Cruz’s controversial works

Sionil José calls Mideo Cruz immature, juvenile
By: Maila Ager
INQUIRER.net
2:01 pm | Tuesday, August 16th, 2011

MANILA, Philippines—National Artist for Literature Francisco Sionil José lambasted on Tuesday the controversial artwork of Mideo Cruz, who put a wooden penis on the image of Jesus Christ, saying it was not an art but an illustration that the artist was “immature” and “juvenile”

“I saw the pictures, which too many people object and I said this is not art. These pictures illustrate that the artist is immature and juvenile in his attempt to express his views,” José said in mixed English and Tagalog when he faced the Senate investigation on the controversial artwork.

“This artist is not all that good because we do it when we were kids, where you put a mustache in people… anó ba yan,” he added.

But José defended art in general, saying there was nothing “obscene” in it compared to the obscenities of corrupt officials in government.

“The obscenities in this country are the powerful Filipinos who do not do their duties, the corrupt officials, who are not responsible. These are the obscenities in our nation. There are only bad artists and bad writers,” he said, which elicited cheers and applause from the people in the hearing room.

José then called on the Cultural Center of the Philippines to be more sensitive to the definition of the art itself.

Good point. For future exhibits, how should art be defined? What are the parameters and benchmarks? Who should criticize art? These and other related questions should be answered so that in the future no more garbage will infiltrate our Cultural Center of the Philippines.

Mideo Cruz, probably mighty proud by now that he's up against Everybody's Favorite Whipping Boy (formally known as the Roman Catholic Church). But now he has earned the ire of a secular heavyweight... and a National Artist at that.

Immature. Juvenile. Probably the best, the most precise choice of words —without honestly resorting to insults— to describe Mideo Cruz’s Poleteísmo garbage.

For his age, Mr. José still has a good eye for aesthetics. So again: he’d better stick to fiction and the arts. So please, stay away from Philippine History. That would also be honoring a dearly departed friend in Nick.

Various comments from Mideo Cruz’s sick art

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“If you just look at artwork and see what offends you, ambabaw mo (you’re shallow-minded).”
Carlos Celdrán

“What sick mind would think that this sacrilegious work promotes Filipino aesthetics, identity and positive cultural values?”
Manila Rep. Amado Bagatsing

“The point is simple: You want to denigrate imams, feel free to do so. You want to make fun of bishops, feel free to do so. But you want to denigrate Islam, or Mohammed, or the Koran, think again. You want to make fun of Christianity, Christ, or the Bible, think again.”
Conrado de Quiros

“It was created by law and funded by our taxes for the purpose of awakening the consciousness of our people to our cultural heritage. Is it our cultural heritage to mock and insult religious personages and icons? Is it aesthetic to vandalize a venerated representation of objects of worship and reverence? Are vulgarity and blasphemy a Filipino value? What Filipino pride can emerge for such works? Is this our national identity? And CCP promotes it?”
Jo Imbong (Executive Director, St. Thomas More Society Inc.)—

Emedeo Cruz (I.N.C.) Sumpain ka, Bakla” and “Bakla Parusahan Ka” (Curse you, fag. You fag, you should be punished).
Hate messages from vandals scrawled across various parts of Cruz’s “artwork”—

My take on this issue? Arnaldo’s recent blogpost pretty much sums up my opinion about Mideo Cruz’s arrogant ignorance and phony artistry. Also, I have this funny feeling that Inquirer columnist Conrado de Quiros, although appearing to be neutral, wouldn’t have written an article regarding this controversy if not for those who vandalized Cruz’s offensive works (“You wreak that, or condone it, what does that say about your beliefs? You wreak that, or condone it, what does that say about your religion?”). In view of his past anti-Church articles, he would have let this Cruz issue go away if not for the vandals.

Imeldific was among the first to react against Cruz's blasphemous and offensive art. CCP, where Cruz's works were exhibited, was a product of hers.

I wish I were a painter. Then I’d paint a picture of Carlos Celdrán, but his nose will be that of a monkey’s prick. Now let’s see how these “intellectuals” and “artists” wannabes will feel about their Dámaso idol being “criticized” through art. If they react negatively, i.e., if they just look at my artwork and see what offends them, ambabaw nilá.

Lucky he, I’m no painter.

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