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Podcasting with Señor Guillermo Gómez Rivera

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For “episode 3” of my podcasting venture with Arnaldo Arnáiz (his idea, actually), we featured our friend and mentor, the veritable and venerable Filipino scholar, Señor Guillermo Gómez y Rivera. On this episode, we talked about the importance of the Spanish language in Filipinas.

The sound quality for episodes 1 and 2 were poor. But for episode 3, there was significant improvement, thanks to Arnaldo’s new recording gadgets. The only thing here which didn’t improve was my voice. 😀

Without further ado, here’s our September 20th podcast with the renaissance man himself, Señor Gómez (WARNING: Be prepared to be blown away with TONS of historical info).

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6 responses »

  1. Señor Pepe, I enjoyed the interview with Señor Gomez. Very informative. Just a quick question that still baffles me to no end, why did Spanish die out in the Philippines? We can’t fault the Americanization of the Philippines because look at Puerto Rico,they still speak Spanish despite being not only an American colony but a territory. In my humble opinion, Spanish wasn’t taught to us early on and didn’t take root long enough for us to love it. When Rizal was clamouring for Spanization of Las Islas Filipinas it was too late. Hatred towards anything Spanish blossomed(the friars did a good job in teaching Filipinos to hate anything Spanish ). What Spain failed to do for 300 years , the Americans easily did in less than a generation. For example, I had a friend(she already passed away) a good old señorita, a peninsulares who is so fluent in Spanish but couldn’t care less speaking it because she found it backwards and ancient that’s why she spoke to me in English. My grandfather who’s a Spanish mestizo never spoke to his children in Spanish because he saw no future in it. Modern Filipinos think Spanish is just a thing of the past and our deep hatred for the atrocities that colonial Spain left us will continue to hound the good efforts to bring Spanish back as a medium of communication. I have this thing with the past, meaning I love to glorify the past, so I am one with you praying for the success of your endeavours. Spanish will make a come back not for sentimental reasons butility for economic ones. Kudos and Dios a bendiga!

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    • Spanish didn’t die out. It’s just that the first missionaries who were sent in the Philippines were disciples of Bartolome de las Casas, who fought for the preservation of the culture and language of the natives in Latin America. These missionaries were very careful in preserving our local languages and dialects, and introduced Spanish words only where there our native pre-hispanic vocabulary was lacking. Later, it became the language of the educated, as having Spanish as a medium of instruction saved more time in printing textbooks to schools. The language only died out during the seventies, when the English language became more or less the language of the country. And even after that, quite a number of Pinoys still speaks it fluently. As an example, my mother spoke Spanish to her mother-in-law up until the latter’s death in 2001. Also, if you happen to go and stay in a Spanish-speaking country, it will only take you six months to learn to conjugate the verbs, because, really, you already have enough vocabulary to get you started.
      BTW, I really enjoyed this blog!

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  2. This podcast is a spot-on and is quite enlightening to say the least. The Freemasonic part of the discussion is a treasure-trove of information and can be used by the Church in the Philippines as an apologetic against its modern enemies and critics.

    Congratulations and I hope for the best in the next podcast. Please do invite Señor Gomez again for another podcast, preferably for two hours, but I will settle for an hour and a half, of course.

    (PS: I’ve wondered what the song in the beginning (and end) is, until i’ve remembered that it is the Pasacalle, sung by Señor Gomez., but I might be mistaken,though)

    Neopelagianus

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  3. Reblogged this on Judica Me, Deus and commented:
    This podcast is a spot-on and is quite enlightening to say the least. The Freemasonic part of the discussion is a treasure-trove of information and can be used by the Church in the Philippines as an apologetic against its modern enemies and critics.

    Like

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