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Everything you need to know about Aling Yolanda

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Sorry I’m not able to blog here regularly anymore. Life is always on the way. Been too much of a busy bee that I wasn’t even able to blog about last month’s heritage-killer quake (but I did mention it here in brief).

As I write this, Filipinas is now bearing the brunt of one of the most powerful super typhoons in history (the winds are howling like mad outside our apartment unit). So powerful it is that I have no other choice but to “invoke my right” to be absent from work tonight. Also, I thought of sharing to the lazy internet user what I found out about Super Typhoon Haiyan, known locally as Yolanda (usually preceded by a hashtag by the social media addict):

Super Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) comes from a Chinese word which means “petrel”, a tube-nosed seabird. From time to time, you might stumble upon the characters 海燕 just to emphasize its being Chinese.
Wind: 270 KPH (as of 11/8/2013, 2:00:00 PM [Malay Peninsula Standard Time])
Location: 11.4N 237.4E
Movement: W at 25 mph

Below are some of the strongest monster twisters in world history:

Super Typhoon Nancy (1961), 215 mph winds, 882 mb. Made landfall as a Cat 2 in Japan, killing 191 people.
Super Typhoon Violet (1961), 205 mph winds, 886 mb pressure. Made landfall in Japan as a tropical storm, killing 2 people.
Super Typhoon Ida (1958), 200 mph winds, 877 mb pressure. Made landfall as a Cat 1 in Japan, killing 1269 people.
Super Typhoon Haiyan (2013), 195 mph winds, 895 mb pressure. Made landfall in the Philippines at peak strength.
Super Typhoon Kit (1966), 195 mph winds, 880 mb. Did not make landfall.
Super Typhoon Sally (1964), 195 mph winds, 895 mb. Made landfall as a Cat 4 in the Philippines.
(Source: Dr. Jeff Masters’ wunderground.com)

It ain’t called super for nothing: tropical cyclone Haiyan/Yolanda strikes the typhoon-prone municipality of Guiuan in Sámar Oriental, like a freaky boss.

• Super Typhoon Haiyan had winds of 195 mph and gusts of 235 mph. This is one of the highest wind speeds ever recorded in a storm in world history.
• It made landfall as the most powerful typhoon or hurricane in recorded history, as based on wind speed measurements from satellites.
• The strength of Haiyan is equal to that of an extremely powerful Category 5 hurricane in the Atlantic. (Typhoons are the same type of storms as hurricanes).
• No hurricane in the Atlantic has ever been this strong; Hurricane Camille hit the U.S. Gulf Coast with an estimated wind speed of 190 mph.

Fight web surfing remissness! Click here for more!

*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*

“Many might wonder if the proper name Yolanda is Latinate. Yes, it is Latinate. In Latin, it is Violanda or Violans, which, respectively, means ‘she who shall be violated’ or ‘the violating one’.”
Dei Præsidio Fultus

*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*

My paternal grandfather, Sr. Don Godofredo Alas y Sarmiento (1925-1997) of Unisan, Tayabas, would have turned 88 today. Requiescat in pace.

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