RSS Feed

Tag Archives: San Pedro Laguna (Noon at Ngayon)

The Future “Shrine City” of Southern Tagalog (San Pedro Tunasán, La Laguna)

Posted on

Welcome to San Pedro, the gateway to La Laguna province!

I’ve been a San Pedrense for close to six years already.

We moved to San Pedro, La Laguna last 2004 at the height of the infamous 2004 Philippine General Elections (where FPJ won in the voting but lost in the counting). My wife was then pregnant with our second child (Momay). I was then working in SPI Technologies in my hometown, Parañaque City. Thus, I had to travel for almost two hours from San Pedro to Parañaque’s Barrio Santo Niño where SPI was located. A female cousin of mine, who is married to a native San Pedrense (from the Igonia clan), helped us find a place to stay. I chose San Pedro because the apartment units there were considerably cheap. Although it’s just beside Metro Manila (via Muntinlupà City), the rates of apartment units there are provincially cheap.

As a history buff, I was very excited to see San Pedro town for the very first time. I was expecting something rural, like that of my dad’s hometown of Unisan, Quezon. I was disappointed to see a rather urbanized place fuming with smoke from countless tricycles, roads teeming with junk food wrappers and assorted litter, and a huge Sogo Hotel at the entrance to the town from Metro Manila. Back then, I haven’t been traveling much. So my expectations were doused cold. Also, I noticed a scarcity of classic Filipino houses which we call bahay castilà or bahay na bató. Only a few remain. I even doubt if those surviving houses date back to the Spanish times. But there are still a couple of postwar houses which somehow resemble the bahay na bató which I adore so much.

We first lived in a small, one-room apartment unit in Sitio Pitóng Gatang in Barrio San Vicente. In late 2007 (I was already working for APAC Customer Services for three years), we moved to a larger apartment building in the same barrio (now called a barangáy).

We’ve befriended a lot of San Pedrense folk. Especially my very amiable wife who knows almost everybody in our barrio: tricycle drivers, various street and market vendors, canto boys and street toughies, elderly folk, etc. She really has that masa attitude in her which I’m so proud at.

Me, I befriended the upper echelon of San Pedro, hehe! I had the privilege of cowriting (with Arnaldo Arnáiz) current Mayor Calixto Catáquiz’s biography (still unpublished, though). I also befriended San Pedro’s official historian, Sonny Ordoña. He cowrote the history of the town with Amalia Cullarín Rosales entitled San Pedro, Laguna: Noón at Ngayón.

This year or next year, we’ll soon be leaving San Pedro. We’ll soon be moving to Calambâ, La Laguna, where we have purchased our own home. But six years is six years. So many things have happened to us here in San Pedro. This is the place where we have totally become independent and slowly built our “little empire”, i.e., our family; before, we had to seek financial support from immediate family members. All my children began their childhood here. My daughter Krystal is a pioneer student of nearby Santa Hideliza Montessori (formerly known as Asturias Angel Montessori School) where she is a consistent first honor student (it’s all in the blood, hehe!). Momay has just started his schooling in the same school. We’ve built friendships. It is here where I discovered and became a devotee of the miraculous Santo Sepulcro. One midnight, as I was headed for work, I even got to beat up a huge street toughie who tried to harass me (seriously)!

For better or for worse, San Pedro Tunasán, La Laguna has become part of us.

Enjoy the pictures which I took of the town (my daughter Krystal and I had an afternoon stroll last 29 December 2009)… =)

St. Peter The Apostle

Banál na Cruz ng San Pedro Tunasán

A view of the urbanized población from the church tower.

The only municipal hall that I know where the mayor's office is located right above a multi-purpose town plaza stage. Unique.

Messy wires mar this view of the town's enormous church.

The road going up to San Pedro Bridge (my daughter Krystal's at the onset).

Naty's Tourist Lodge / Restaurant. However, what is interesting for tourists to see in San Pedro? This is what the next administration should work on. Tourism is also important economically.

Tanghalang F.A. Vierneza, a waste of public funds if you ask my opinion.

Going up the bridge, further south of San Pedro.

San Pedro Bridge

The semi-polluted river of San Pedro. The river still teems of fish and other river creatures. There is still hope to save this body of water. A sincere environmental effort from the local government is direly needed.

Mount Maquíling from afar.

Suki Wet & Dry Market

Iglesia de San Pedro Apóstol

The altarpiece.

The Nativity scene (all these photos, by the way, were taken last 12/29/2009).

Liceo de San Pedro (San Pedro High School)

Very few Antilean (bahay na bató) houses remain in San Pedro, which is quite sad. The one in this photo has been converted into a commercial establishment.

Many streets in the oldest parts of San Pedro look like this. Good thing these pink bougainvilla flowers beautify the place a bit.

One of my favorite flowering plants: the eye-catching bougainvilla!

Typhoon Ondoy floods were already subsiding when this photo was taken. But this dirt road leading to the lakeshore was still soft and very muddy. Thus, Krystal and I didn't push through with our lakeshore trek.

A fishpond a few meters away from the lake. It was also damaged by Typhoon Ondoy.

San Roque Elementary School in Barrio San Roque.

Ducks raised near the lake. San Pedro used to have huge balót and iticán industry which rivaled that of Pateros.

Water lilies fill the banks of Laguna de Bay in this part of Barrio Landayan.

Flowering water lilies!

Black birds flying excitedly over the lake! Are they crows?

Seashells embedded inland, meters away from the lake.

The modern church tower of the mysterious Santo Sepulcro Church in Barrio Landayan.

Iglesia de Santo Sepulcro

An ancient acacia tree in front of the Santo Sepulcro Church.

My daughter, Jewel Krystal Rose, when she was four years old (on my 25th birthday). I didn't allow her to be baptized at a much earlier date because I was an atheist before. This miraculous church further reaffirmed and strengthened my belief in God. =)

Light.

Dark.

The Holy Sepulchre which houses the iconic icon of Jesus Christ, known all over San Pedro Tunasán as the miraculous Lolo Uweng.

A busy part of the town.

Vegetables, fruits, and spices being sold out on the streets, a usual Latin-American activity.

¡Caramba! He's everywhere!

Bibingca and puto bumbóng vendors; all pictures were taken during the 2009 Christmas Season.

Puto bumbóng

Bibingca

Sampaguita buds in the town plaza. San Pedro Tunasán is also known as the country's Sampaguita capital.

Missed the whole name, haha! The bus was moving fast... and I was moving slow!

Krystal buying a Sampaguita collar.

La flor de la sampaguita, una flor filipina.

The massive façade of the San Pedro Apóstol Parish Church.

The statue of the Virgin Mary on top of the church which can be seen from miles around.

Not sure if this house is prewar or postwar. But it's definitely vintage.

Calle San Vicente goes through a tunnel beneath the San Pedro Bridge.

Another Filipino-style house.

This one's a charm!

This railroad goes all the way to Ciudad de Legazpi, Albay in Bícol province.

Coconuts!

Santa Hideliza Montessori School, where Krystal and Momay study.

Capilla de San Vicente de Ferrer

A neighbor leading us to one of San Pedro's last few remaining Sampaguita plantations. The town used to have huge plantations everywhere. Many of the townsfolk relied on the sampaguita trade for a living. But that was long ago.

¡Ang manóc ni San Pedro!

Today, the once flourishing sampaguita farms have been relegated to a mere backyard industry.

Bamboo (not the band).

Our San Pedro Tunasán walk ended at dusk.

A FEW THINGS YOU MAY WANT TO KNOW ABOUT SAN PEDRO TUNASÁN, LA LAGUNA’S PAST AND FUTURE

The former name of San Pedro was San Pedro Tunasán. San Pedro is from one of Jesus Christ’s apostles. Tunasán comes from the word tunás which is a medicinal herb that used to grow along the western banks of Laguna de Bay where the said town is now situated. Significantly, this herb was actually brought here by the friars from México.

San Pedro was inhabited by Tagalog tribesmen before the Spanish arrival. Spanish friars (Franciscans) assembled many Tagalog tribes in what is now known as La Laguna province through a process called reducción a pueblo, creating what we now know as a town or pueblo/municipio. San Pedro Tunasán is a product of this complex process.

San Pedro Tunasán during the Spanish period produced considerable quantities of rice, mangoes, coconuts, native oranges, lemons, buyô (betel leaves), and even sugar cane. And according to the Diccionario Geográfico-Estadístico-Histórico de las Islas Filipinas (Fr. Manuel Buzeta, O.S.A., and Fr. Felipe Bravo, O.S.A), there used to be a big house made of brick and tiled-roof which was a silk factory. Unfortunately, it’s not stated in the book where this old bahay na bató was situated, thus I have no idea if it still stands.

San Pedro was also owned by the Jesuits and was used as an estate (or hacienda) to fund their projects and other activities, particularly the Colegio de San José in Intramuros (where José Rizal’s father, Francisco Mercado, studied). It was the Jesuits who built a chapel (ermita) dedicated to St. Peter the Apostle (now known as the Parish of San Pedro Apóstol).

San Pedro Tunasán used to be a part of Tabuco (an old Tagalog term which means “the end part of a river”), a large town which was also then comprised of what are now the towns of Bíñán, Santa Rosa, Cabuyao. It officially became a town when it was detached from Tabuco on 18 January 1725 upon the request of San Pedrense principalía led by Alonzo Magtibay, Francisco Santiago, and Ignacio de Guevarra. Their request was granted by the last Spanish Habsburg king himself, King Charles II. Santiago subsequently became the first town mayor. Therefore, the real foundation day of San Pedro Tunasán should be celebrated every 18th of January and not on any other dates.

Many years later, a large northern chunk of the town was sold to Muntinlupà. That chunk of land is now Muntinlupà City’s Barrio Tunasán (where many lechón stalls abound). That is why the town today is simply called San Pedro. But I refuse to call it as such. I always prefer the original, giving due respect to history: ¡San Pedro Tunasán, La Laguna!

The city’s incumbent mayor, Calixto Catáquiz, who’s running for reelection this May, plans to make San Pedro a “Shrine City”, as written in his still unpublished biography, A Date With Destiny (One More Challenge!) The Life Story of San Pedro:

“Mayor Catáquiz is a visionary,” says Sonny Ordoña, the town’s resident historian and the municipal hall’s consultant for cultural affairs. “Once he asked me for a unique nickname for the town. Since we have a couple of shrines here, particularly the miraculous Santo Sepulcro Shrine in Landayan, I suggested to him, ‘well, why not dub it as a Shrine City?’ His eyes beamed with the idea. The next thing you know, he’s telling everyone that he’s planning to create a 30-storey high bronze statue of Jesus Christ! He wants it installed up in the mountains of San Pedro!”

The feet of this gigantic statue ala Cristo Redentor of Rio de Janeiro would stand on four chapels. These chapels will serve as monumental pedestals. An incredible concept that is already being planned!

“This chapel would be in full view from Alabang and possibly from Parañaque,” says the mayor. “Aircraft will easily discern it from atop.” Certainly, this future landmark will place San Pedro on a national scale!

Shrine city or not, San Pedro Tunasán is all worth it. All it needs is full and sincere cooperation between the local government and its inhabitants.

Santuario de Jesús en el Santo Sepulcro (Landayan, San Pedro Tunasán, La Laguna)

Posted on

One day in 2004, I was walking around San Pedro, La Laguna looking for an apartment for my young family. I was about to relocate them there from our place in BF Homes-Parañaque, Las Piñas City. A female cousin of mine who married a San Pedrense suggested that I move there because of the low cost of living (particularly the house rents) although it’s just a few kilometers away from the Metro.

I happened to pass by one of San Pedro’s barrios called Landayan. The place somehow had a rustic feel to it. Somehow, my tired feet led me to a small, queer church which I first thought was a chapel. But upon nearing it, I realized it was a church. It was closely tucked within the small houses around it.

In front of this church was a wide-roofed multi-purpose gymnasium. Between the gym and the barrio road is a small plaza with two ancient acacia trees. Being a newly reconverted Catholic, I strolled around the church out of interest.

I then wondered what the name that church was…

The Shrine of Jesus Christ in the Holy Sepulchre, Landayan, San Pedro, La Laguna.

The Shrine of Jesus Christ in the Holy Sepulchre, Landayan, San Pedro, La Laguna.

Suddenly, a jeepney passed by in front of it. Like most jeepneys in the country, it had a banner on top of it. The name painted on that banner: SANTO SEPULCRO. And it’s sooner than I realized that Santo Sepulcro –or Parroquia de Santo Sepulcro (Parokya ng Santo Sepulcro in corrupted Tagalog)– is the name of that church.

I entered the empty church. The big wooden doors were half open. It was a late weekday afternoon, a Saturday if memory serves me right. I stopped for a while to pray for brighter days ahead as a feeble afternoon sunlight streamed through the colored glass panels.

It was the beginning of a beautiful covenant between me and Santo Sepulcro, my favorite of all churches. I later learned that the church, particulary the black wooden image of Jesus Christ in a sepulchre, was miraculous. Hungry for the lost years of Christianity, I instantly became a devotee. As much as possible, all Fridays of the month should find me there. It was also at Parroquia de Santo Sepulcro where my two children, Krystal and Momay –who I refused to be baptized in the past due to my rabid atheism– were baptized at the same time; and it happened during my twenty-fifth birthday, one of the happiest days of my life!

And a few years later, on 1 December 2006, I was fortunate to witness a historic event when Parroquia de Sto. Sepulcro was proclaimed the Shrine of Jesus Christ in the Holy Sepulchre, or Dambana ni Jesús sa Banál na Libiñgan in Tagalog (Santuario de Jesucristo en el Santo Sepulcro in Spanish).

The church is oftentimes compared to the famous Quiapó Church because of countless devotees who visit the church every Friday. No one is sure when this Friday devotion began, but it has become a sort of “tourist and religious attraction” for the bustling municipality of San Pedro, La Laguna. Some people even call this church “The Quiapó church of Laguna”.

Because of the biography that I’m currently cowriting (with Arnold Arnáiz) for Mayor Calixto Catáquiz of San Pedro (and perhaps through divine intercession), I was very fortunate to have met Gaudencio “Sonny” Ordoña, San Pedro’s resident historian. After the success of his book SAN PEDRO, LAGUNA: (NOON AT NGAYON) which he cowrote with scholar Amalia Cullarín Rosales, Kuya Sonny didn’t stop his momentum when he wrote and published his sophomore book entitled LOLO UWENG NG LANDAYAN (SA ISIP AT PUSO NG MGA DEBOTO) which is all about the history and testimonials of the church and its miraculous image, as well as the miracles attributed to them. Kuya Sonny was even so kind and trusting when he assigned me to translate his book into English (still unpublished). Kuya Sonny soon became a friend and even a spiritual adviser for me.

The arched entrance of the road which leads to the miraculous church.

The name of the church posted beside the arch.

The name of the church posted beside the arch.

This morning, I thought of taking my wife’s phone camera along with me and take some pictures and videos. It was to be my first time to go there on a very rainy Friday morning. I was surprised to still encounter the same multitude that I used to see there on sunny Fridays! The bad weather didn’t hamper the people’s devotion and will to visit Lolo Uweng in the Holy Sepulchre.

Lolo Uweng is how the devotees fondly call the sacred image. The following text is an excerpt taken from my still unpublished translation of Kuya Sonny’s best-selling book (available at all National Bookstores around San Pedro, La Laguna and at the Shrine itself):

LOLO UWENG NG LANDAYAN, Sa Isip at Puso ng mga Deboto (Biblio de ESDM de Landaian)

LOLO UWENG NG LANDAYAN, Sa Isip at Puso ng mga Deboto (Biblio de ESDM de Landaian)

Official Version

For a long period of time, devotees have exchanged alleged “true” histories among themselves regarding the origin of Lolo Uweng. Some say that he was a man who mysteriously turned into wood. Others claim that he was a piece of timber in the shape of a sleeping man. Because such stories go against the laws and principles of nature and science —and since superstition is clouded with mysteries— more questions than answers arose due to these various legends. Neither legend was accepted as the official versions.

In 2003, the administrators of the Parish of Sto. Sepulcro published the first official history of the image of Lolo Uweng. It is included in the document The Parish Profile, intended as a preparation for the shrinehood of the parish. Led by then Parish Administrator Msgr. Jerry V. Bitoon, the document was submitted to the Diocese of San Pablo. The document was regarded as a fundamental basis in the issuance of a decree. Thus, on December 1, 2006, the parish was proclaimed as the Shrine of Jesus Christ in the Holy Sepulchre.

This official report was regarded as a mere presumption due to a lack of documentary evidence. According to the report, the image could well have been a sculpture that was carved from a neighboring lakeshore town of Laguna Lake that is reputed for its people’s artistry; possible candidates are Angono in Rizal Province, and Paeté in Laguna (it should be noted that several giant-sized murals found in various churches throughout the Philippines are products of Angono sculptors). The image could’ve been set afloat on purpose by the sculptor o whoever owned it. Another theory is that it could have been washed towards the lake due to a severe storm which caused flooding; it was then carried by the currents towards the shores of Landayan where it was found by fishermen. It was regarded by them as miraculous; they built for it an altar and placed it inside a small chapel which was then known as a visita.

The summary of this version is inscribed on a bronze marker found at the entrance to the church:

…an image of the dead Jesus was found in the lakeshore of Landayan, San Pedro, Laguna. Since it was believed that the image is miraculous, the people of Landayan kept it and encased it in a camarín which was placed inside the visita for veneration. The event gave way to the devotion of Jesus in the Holy Sepulchre accompanied by stories regarding the miraculous icon as testified by both the local parishioners and the devotees from nearby provinces.

The road just below the Santo Sepulcro arch is called Calle Hernández; this road will lead you to the miraculous church.

The road just below the Santo Sepulcro arch is called Calle Hernández; this road will lead you to the miraculous church.

You may walk all the way to the church, or take a ride in smoke-free pedal-powered pedicabs (padiác).

You may walk all the way to the church, or take a ride in smoke-free pedal-powered pedicabs (padiác).

07-08-09_0857

A sculpture of a dead Jesus Christ with an angel by his side.

A sculpture of a dead Jesus Christ with an angel by his side.

Multi-colored candles can be found anywhere around the church.

Multi-colored candles can be found anywhere around the church.

Inside the church. In front is the altar wrapped in golden lights.

Inside the church. In front is the altar wrapped in golden lights.

Decree of Erection.

Decree of Erection.

DECREE OF ERECTION

DIOCESAN SHRINE OF JESUS IN THE HOLY SEPULCHRE

After having considered the petition of the many devotees of Jesus in the Holy Sepulchre, also known as “Lolo Uweng” here in the Parish of Santo Sepulcro, Landayan, San Pedro, Laguna, administered to by the Reverend Father Jeremías O. Oblepias, Jr. and after having consulted the College of Consultors and the Presbyteral Council.

We see that fostering the devotion to Jesus Christ in the Holy Sepulchre will enrich holiness for the Church; and so We hereby

DECREE

That the Santo Sepulcro Parish in Landayan, San Pedro, Laguna be conferred the title

DIOCESAN SHRINE OF JESUS IN THE HOLY SEPULCHRE

By this Decree of Erection, We also grant to the said Diocesan Shrine of Jesus in the Holy Sepulchre all the rights and privileges. It shall furthermore be governed by the provisions of cc. 1230-1234 of the Code of Canon Law.

Given in Landayan, San Pedro, Laguna, on this first day of December, in the second year of the Pontificate of His Holiness, Benedict XVI, in the year of our Lord two thousand and six.

LEO M. DRONA, SBD, D.D.
Bishop of San Pedro

Attested by:

REV. FR. CÉSAR A. GONZALES, JR.
Chancellor

The church's brief history in bronze.

The church's brief history in bronze.

Sampaguita vendors. San Pedro, La Laguna is the Sampaguita Capital of the Philippines.

Sampaguita vendors. San Pedro, La Laguna is the Sampaguita Capital of the Philippines.

Religious items for sale (at right is Kuya Sonny’s book about Lolo Uweng and his church).

Religious items for sale (at right is Kuya Sonny’s book about Lolo Uweng and his church).

07-08-09_0905

07-08-09_0907

07-08-09_0908

On top of the altar is the glass-covered encasement (camarín) which holds the miraculous image of Lolo Uweng. On the other side of this, a long queue of devotees patiently wait to hold the image.

On top of the altar is the glass-covered encasement (camarín) which holds the miraculous image of Lolo Uweng. On the other side of this, a long queue of devotees patiently wait to hold the image.

Taken from the choirloft.

Taken from the choirloft.

Candelabra.

Candelabra.

"Ama namin, sumasalañguit ca..."
Agnus Dei.

Agnus Dei.

The Holy Communion commences...

The Holy Communion commences...

The long queue to Lolo Uweng. This hall is at the right side of the church.

The long queue to Lolo Uweng. This hall is at the right side of the church.

A frame of Fr. José María Escrivá which hangs on the hall leading to Lolo Uweng.

A frame of Fr. José María Escrivá which hangs on the hall leading to Lolo Uweng.

The Holy Communion ends.

The Holy Communion ends.

The patient devotees finally reach Lolo Uweng. During Holy Week, the queue could stretch as far as Calambâ!

The patient devotees finally reach Lolo Uweng. During Holy Week, the queue could stretch as far as Calambâ!

Legend of the Image’s Name

According to elders, foreigners from faraway places who visited Landayan have reportedly met an old man there who introduced himself as Emmanuel Salvador del Mundo. They claimed that the old man invited them to visit his home which was located near the big acacia trees of Landayan. Many of them heeded the request. Upon reaching Landayan, they realized that the “home” that was described to them by the old man is none other than the church, the visita itself, which has big acacia trees fronting it! And the old man who invited them has a striking resemblance to the Holy Image in the Holy Sepulchre!

There used to be six huge acacia trees that were at the plaza of Landayan, one of which was near the Balón ng Mahál na Señor; it was later cut down to give way for the widening of the plaza. Three of the trees were at the middle part of the plaza, and it was also necessary to cut these to give way for the construction of the concrete stage, basketball court, and the building of the Pamahalaang Barangay and Day Care. The last two remaining acacia trees are still alive, standing right in front of the church, playing as silent witnesses to all the happenings of yore which was related to Lolo Uweng. It was said that if only these two giants were able to speak, they would have manifested more stories about Lolo Uweng.

Tita Ledy said that the whole name of Emmanuel Salvador del Mundo was etched in the very first camarín (encasement) that was made of wood and glass. It was crafted by the elders soon after discovering the image by the lakeshore. This simple camarín was on top of a simple concrete platform in the middle of the visita’s altar. The image can be seen from the inside of the visita. It can be reached by a tunnel-like passage four steps high towards the camarín behind the altar. This is where devotees pass through to kiss and touch the sacred image.

Lelong Uweng was the original nickname of the image; in many parts of the Tagalog region, Lelong is what elderly people are fondly called. On the other hand, Uweng was a usual nickname for Emmanuel. Lelong was subsequently changed to Lolo to conform to the term’s evolution.

Perhaps Lolo Uweng would be the nickname that will stick to the image until the end of time.

Praying briefly but fervently.

Praying briefly but fervently.

07-08-09_0925

This crown of thorns was made from the very same plant that produced the original crown which bloodied our Lord's head.

This crown of thorns was made from the very same plant that produced the original crown which bloodied our Lord's head.

Another beautiful candelabra.

Another beautiful candelabra.

"He humbled himself, becoming obedient to death, even death on a cross." Philippians 2:8
Adoration chapel.

Adoration chapel.

Kuya Sonny's book on sale for only P150.00. Much cheaper here compared to buying it from National Bookstore.

Kuya Sonny's book on sale for only P150.00. Much cheaper here compared to buying it from National Bookstore.

07-08-09_0932

Brightly colored bricks.

Brightly colored bricks.

This leads to the Garden of Saints.

This leads to the Garden of Saints.

A replica of Lolo Uweng.

A replica of Lolo Uweng.

Blessing after Holy Mass.

Blessing after Holy Mass.

Marble basin for the agua bendita.

Marble stoup for the agua bendita.

That's me! So fuzzy!

That's me! So fuzzy!

Fridays in Barrio Landayan are lively, colorful, and festive. During that day, many vendors here from all over La Laguna sell their wares.

The modern church tower, made possible through various donors.

The miraculous well of Lolo Uweng, a few steps away from the church. Countless individuals who have various ailments claim to have been cured of this ancient well's mysterious water. A few days after my son Momay was born, his eyes suffered from an abnormal secretion of mucous. No amount of medication was able to cure him, until we brought him here. My wife sprinkled Momay's eyes with water from this miraculous well. Almost immediately, his eyes were cured — believe it or not!

Here are more photos which I took a week later (08/14/2009)…

Blessed oils.

Saint Michael the Archangel (with Mr. Loser underneath his heels), the patron saint of Barrio Landayan.

Multi-purpose hall.

*******

(This blogpost was last updated on 09/12/2010.)

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 779 other followers

%d bloggers like this: