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Category Archives: Tragedy

Now on its fourth year: still no good news on the Maguindanáo Massacre

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Photo: AP/Bullit Márquez

The grisly Maguindanáo Massacre is now on its fourth year, yet there is still less positive news for the deadliest incident in the history of news media. Because despite the overwhelming evidence, nobody has been sentenced yet. Incredible.

The perpetrators must be silently thanking Janet Nápoles and super typhoon Yolanda for stealing the limelight from them. But the scoundrels must have forgotten that Filipinos no longer have a short memory span — they will have to curse for social media for that.

Justice delayed is justice denied. But we’ll continue to be on guard. A-holes.

Hombac” is the Tagalog term for storm surge

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Finding a Filipino word for storm surge: ‘Daluyong’ or ‘humbak’?

Posted at 11/18/2013 8:41 PM | Updated as of 11/18/2013 9:35 PM

MANILA – Not many people in the Philippines knew what a storm surge was before ‘Yolanda’ hit central Philippines. It was a new concept that did not arouse fear, unlike the the word tsunami, which evokes images of the destruction in Japan in March 2011 and in countries affected by the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake.

After the super typhoon claimed the lives of more than 4,000 (and counting), people began to criticize authorities for not explaining well what a storm surge is.

Filipino-American geologist and environmental scientist Kelvin Rodolfo told ANC authorities correctly warned about the threat posed by storm surges before Yolanda struck on November 8, but many did heed the warning.

Thus, Rodolfo suggested there should be a Filipino term for “storm surges.”

He said communication is key in effective information dissemination.

Rodolfo disagreed with some local officials of Leyte and Sámar who say they it would have been better if they had been told that a tsunami was coming.

He said the public should not be warned of an incoming tsunami when what is going to happen is a “storm surge”.

“While people know what tsunami is like, we could have generated unnecessary panic…and you would have also killed people in panic,” he said.

Rodolfo said a tsunami is triggered by an earthquake, and a storm surge is not.

CLICK HERE to read the rest.

Photo by Aarón Fávila.

In light of super typhoon Yolanda’s record-breaking onslaught last November 8, there has been a debate on what should really be the Tagalog equivalent of “storm surge”. National Artist Virgilio Almario says it’s “daloyong” (or “daluyong“) while Lagunense historian Jaime Tiongson, using the 17th-century Spanish-Tagalog dictionary “Vocabulario de la Lengua Tagala” as his basis, claims that it should be “hombac” (or “humbak“).

I support Almario’s advocacy of using Filipinas instead of the dull-sounding Philippines to refer to our country (more on this in a future blogpost). But with regard to a Tagalog term for “storm surge”, I’ll go for Tiongson’s “hombac” because it was well defined/mentioned at least three times in that ancient dictionary which was compiled by Fr. Pedro de San Buenaventura (published in Pila, La Laguna in 1613) and it accurately describes the tragedy that happened in Tacloban (and other nearby areas) early this month. Below are three entries for that ancient Tagalog word in the said dictionary:

1) ARibar : Hombac pc : con tormenta es de la costa y tambien de la laguna : significa, golpe de mar, cami.y. hinohombacan nang dagat, hiconos la mar arribar aputos golpes de sus olas. http://sb.tagalogstudies.org/2010/10/77.html
2) Fondo : Humbac pc : de entre ola y ola, hungmohumbac .1.ac. hazer fondos la mar, hinohumbacan .1.P. . ser arrojado y goldpeado dellos, humbac aya nang dagat nayto, o que de fondos haçe esta mar. http://sb.tagalogstudies.org/2010/10/323.html
3) Ola : Vmbac pc : que hae el agua con la fuera del viento, hinohumbacan .1.P. ser golpeado dellas; patabi tayo at nang di tayo humbacan, bamos haia la orilla no nos golpeen las olas. http://sb.tagalogstudies.org/2010/10/452.html
(emphasis mine)

As can be gleaned from above, we can easily see that “hombac” has been associated with storms (“con tormenta“) or a strong/violent surge of water (“golpe de mar“, “ser arrojado“). Also, in definition 3, I believe there is a typographical error: instead of la fuera del viento (outside the wind), I’m pretty sure Fr. San Buenaventura meant la fuerza del viento (wind force) especially when preceded by “que hae el agua con“. Now, hae is another typo error (it doesn’t mean anything at all in Spanish); it should be hace (yes, this ancient book has lots of typos with many words lacking the appropriate accent marks). Loosely translated into English, “que hace el agua con la fuerza del viento” means “what the water makes (or what happens to the water) when blown by forceful winds”.

Meanwhile, (and if I’m not mistaken), Almario’s “daluyong” appears in only one entry (spelled archaically) in the country’s oldest dictionary, and it is even subcategorized under the Spanish word “ola” which means “wave”:

Ola : Daloyon pp : de la mar o de otra agua, dungmadaloyon .1.ac. olear el agua, dina daloyonan .1.P. ser golpeado; lubha tayong dina daloyonan nitong dagat, mucho nos golpeen las olas. http://sb.tagalogstudies.org/2010/10/452.html

Unfortunately for Almario, his Tagalog candidate for storm surge had nothing to do with gale-force winds nor storms.

On a related note, the city of Mandaloyong in Metro Manila was named after “daloyon” which meant “a place of waves” because hundreds of years ago, there used to be a beach there. Due to geographical and tidal shifts coupled with anthropogenic circumstances, that beach is no more; it is now covered by the bustling city of Macati, “a place of tides”. The place therefore opened up to what is now Manila Bay.

For the sake of argument, let us pretend that Almario is correct. Since Mandaloyong was named as such, it can be surmised that it was frequently visited by large waves. But frequently visited by large tidal waves or wave surges? A stretch. Besides, there has been no record of a tidal wave —or a storm surge— that had happened in Manila Bay. At least, none that I know of.

Tiongson is correct. What destroyed Tacloban was a deadly hombac, not a surfer-friendly daloyong.

*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*

It’s not over till it’s over. People in the Visayas still need our help. Their road to recovery will not be overnight. It might take months or even years. So please, let us do everything we can to help them. Remember: we are all in this together.

La gente filipina es una familia, no una nación. :-)

Please CLICK HERE on how you can help our Visayan brothers and sisters. Thank you.

How to help Yolanda victims

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So you want to help the victims of super typhoon Yolanda but don’t know where to start. One easy way is to logon to a search engine and look for charitable orgnizations. Then you may donate relief goods and/or cash, or even assist in repackaging the goods themselves. Below are just some of the institutions (with their contact details) that offer immediate assistance…

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ABS-CBN Foundation Sagip Kapamilya

For in-kind donations, ABS-CBN is accepting clothes, shoes, blankets in good condition, canned goods, and drinks. You may send it in ABS-CBN Foundation Sagip Kapamilya drop-off centers.

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Adamson University Charity Hub

Adamson University (AdU), through the Integrated Community Extension Services (ICES), is launching the AdU Charity Hub once more to provide relief and help to those affected by super typhoon Yolanda. The Society of Saint Vincent de Paul (SSVP) and the Vincentian Family Coordinating Council (VFCC) Philippines will be collaborating with AdU in this effort. Please click here for more information.

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Ateneo de Manila University Disaster Response and Management (DReAM) Team

The Ateneo de Manila University Disaster Response and Management Team (DReaM Team), in cooperation with Jesuit NGO Simbahang Lingkod Bayan (SLB) and the Department of Social Welfare and Development, organized a relief operation for the victims of  super typhoon Yolanda. DReaM Team is accepting cash donations and relief goods. Please click here for more information.

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Ayala Foundation, Inc.

The foundation is appealing for help to assist the victims of Typhoon Yolanda. They are accepting cash donations:

* Click here for local credit card holders.
* Click here for US-based donors.
* Click here for A-Deals Subscribers.

Please click here for more information.

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Caritas Filipinas Foundation

Caritas Filipinas Foundation is accepting cash donations through banks and online.

For donation in PhP from overseas:
Bank Name: Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI)
Branch: Intramuros
Account Name: CBCP Caritas Filipinas Foundation Inc.
Account Number: 4951-0071-08
Swift Code: BOPIPHMM

For Donation in USD or EUR from overseas:
Bank Name: Philtrust Bank
Branch: Head Office
Account Name: CBCP Caritas Filipinas Foundation Inc.
DOLLAR Account: 0034-0001716-6
EURO Account: 0035-0000008-6
Swift Code: PHTBPHMM

Please click here for more information.

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Cebú Provincial Government

The provincial government of Cebú calls for volunteers to repack relief goods for Northern Cebú, Leyte and Bojol victims. For those who are interested, you may contact Evelyn Senajón at PSWDO, Ground Floor Executive Bldg., Cebú Provincial Capitol at 254-7198 and 254-8397.

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Department of Social Welfare and Development

Location: NAIA Chapel Road, Pásay City (at the back of CAAP)

The Department of Social Welfare and Development accepts cash deposits through their Landbank of the Philippines account. The account numbers: Current-3122-1011-84 Savings-3124-0055-81. If you wish to volunteer in repacking relief goods, you may call 8512681 for schedule.

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Gawad Kalinga — Operation Walang Iwanan: Typhoon Yolanda

Gawad Kalinga accepts cash donations only at their Philippine Peso Current Account number-3101 0977 56 BPI EDSA Greenhills and US$ Savings Account number-3104 0162 34

* BPI EDSA Greenhills. Their swift code is BOPIPHMM

Please click here for more information.

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GMA Kapuso Foundation

GMA is accepting monetary and in kind donations. For relief goods, the drops off points are:

GMA Kapuso Foundation. 2nd Floor Kapuso Center, GMA Network Drive corner Sámar Streets, Dilimán, Quezon City. Call 928-4299/928-9351.

GMA Kapuso Foundation Warehouse. 366 GMA Compound Tandang Sora Avenue Brgy. Culiat, Quezon City. Call 931-7013.

Monetary donations can be deposited at any Metrobank, UCPB, PNB and Cebuana Lhuillier branch. Please click here for more information.

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Jollibee Group Foundation

The Jollibee Group Foundation accepts cash or check donations to these bank accounts:

PESO ACCOUNT:
Metrobank – Cubáo Araneta Branch
Account Name: Jollibee Group Foundation
Account Number: 473-7-47301401-3

DOLLAR ACCOUNT:
BDO – Megamall Branch
Account Name: Jollibee Foundation, Inc.
Account Number: 100-661-267-008
Swift Code: BNORPHMM

For inquiries or donors who would want to advise regarding their assistance, you may call +63.2.688-7133. For your donations to be properly acknowledged, you may either fax the bank transaction slip at +63.2.688-7038 or send a scanned copy of the bank transaction slip to foundation@jollibee.com.ph with your name, address, and contact number. Please click here for more information.

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McDonald’s

All McDonald’s stores nationwide are now accepting donations in kind such as bottled water, rice, ready to eat food, toiletries, beddings, clothes and medicines for affected communities in Tacloban and other nearby areas devastated by Typhoon Haiyan.

In partnership with ABS-CBN Sagip Kapamilya, Department of Social Welfare and Development and local government units, collected relief goods will be distributed to these affected areas.

For cash or check donations, customers may be advised to directly deposit to:
Account Name: Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Philippines

Citibank N.A.
8741 Citibank Bldg., Paseo de Roxas Makati City
Account No# 060-1374-005
Swift Code: CITIUS33

Account Name: Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Philippines
Bank of the Philippine Islands
CA# 3021-4107-47

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Operation Blessing Philippines

The group is accepting cash donations only. The following are the details to send money.

Metrobank
Account name: OPERATION BLESSING FOUNDATION PHILS., INC.
Account number: 270-3-27050273-4

Banco de Oro (Bdo)
Account name: OPERATION BLESSING FOUNDATION PHILS., INC.
Account number: 30000-55279

Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI)
Account name: OPERATION BLESSING FOUNDATION PHILS., INC.
Account number: 3001-0040-33

You may also send your donation in the form of check or postal money order payable to Operation Blessing through mail. Address it to Operation Blessing, P.O. Box 2572 MCPO, 1265 Makati, Philippines. Please click here for more information.

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Philippine Daily Inquirer

Philippine Red Cross


You may donate to the Philippine Red Cross (PRC) through SMS by texting RED and send it to 2899 for Globe and 4143 for Smart. You can donate the following denominations: Globe: ₱5, ₱25, ₱100, ₱300, ₱500 or ₱1,000 and for Smart: ₱10, ₱25, ₱50, ₱100, ₱300, ₱500, or ₱1.000.

For cash deposits:

Banco De Oro
Peso: 00-453-0018647
Dollar: 10-453-0039482
Swift Code: BNORPHMM

Metrobank
Peso: 151-3-041631228
Dollar: 151-2-15100218-2
Swift Code: MBTCPHMM

Philippine National Bank
Peso: 3752 8350 0034
Dollar: 3752 8350 0042
Swift Code: PNBMPHMM

Unionbank of the Philippines
Peso: 1015 4000 0201
Dollar: 1315 4000 0090
Swift code: UBPHPHMM

For in-kind donation you may send it to the PRC – National Headquarters in Manila. You may also contact them to arrange donation pick-up.

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United Nations Children’s Fund

The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) are accepting cash donations. The amount that you may donate from the choices are ₱1,500, ₱3, 300, and ₱5,000. Please click here for more information.

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University of the Philippines

The University of the Philippines (UP) Office of the Student Regent are accepting donations in cash or kind. Their drop off point is Vinzon’s Hall, UP Dilimán, Quezon City. You may contact Alex Castro at 0917-8725396 or tweet him at @uscupdiliman, Eds 0927384-1392 and Zie 0916796-5740. Please click here for more information.

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IMPORTANT NOTE: The government has been receiving some flak over the seemingly incompetent handling of the crisis, particulary the distribution of relief goods and medicine. One major complaint is that these have not been reaching their designated areas on time, if at all. To my observation, I think one major reason why the flow of relief goods is slow is because there is a severe lack of repackers. There has been a steady supply of donations all right, but not enough people to repack them, hence slowing the pace of our government’s relief efforts. This has been confirmed by Twitter user Lendl Tan-Monterola (@_lendl_) who was part of one of the repackaging teams.

To those who read this: please, please, PLEASE spend a few hours of your time to join the repackaging of relief goods. Our countrymen in the Visayas region are starving every day. Thank you so much.

Tacloban before and after Yolanda (satellite imagery)

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Inquirer.net has just released two satellite photos of typhoon-ravaged Tacloban City, Leyte which they obtained from Astrium Services.  One photo show a view of part of the city on 7 March 2013, or just a few weeks before this year’s summer, juxtaposed with a view of the same area taken on 13 November 13 2013, or  five days after super typhoon Yolanda cut a damaging swath through Filipinas Central. Click here to view the images.

Hunger thoughts on Yolanda

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I went on an errand to Calambâ last Monday to pay some bills. I accidentally brought insufficient funds, thus I wasn’t able to buy me some lunch. I was waiting for hours on a long queue while contemplating for food and drink. A smelly character beside me was munching some deep-fried peanuts! I had half a mind asking for some, even if it’s just a couple of half-burnt, half-fried salted garlic bits. It was a crazy, debilitating moment for me, some regular guy with a huge appetite (don’t let my thin frame fool you).

I started to weaken, my sight becoming a blur. I had a book with me to keep me company, but I couldn’t even read it anymore. And I must have swallowed a glassful of spit, a pathetic way to remain hydrated.

I just couldn’t wait to get home!

And then I remembered our poor brothers and sisters in the Visayas region, most of whom haven’t eaten for days on a regular basis. I just missed my lunch, but these poor souls have been missing food for days. Not just a few hours… DAYS!

So don’t you ever dare call their desperate search for food as LOOTING.

To those reading this on their comfy seats who think they have bigger problems: THINK AGAIN.

Tulfo: I saw people walking aimlessly like zombies

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Veteran journalist Ramón Tulfo’s account of his visit to Yolanda-ravaged Tacloban city has just been published a few hours ago and is worth reblogging. Manong Mon formed a medical and mercy mission to help out in the relief efforts. As a result of his stay there, he gives us a very clear description of the horrors of the aftermath of arguably the strongest typhoon in world history, as well as emotional insights from himself and his team. What he and his staff witnessed traumatized them.

Reading his account traumatized me too. Especially this scene:

I saw two children, aged between 5 and 9, separated from their parents as they were taken away to ride on a PAF C-130 plane. The parents had been barred from boarding by soldiers, as the plane was already full.

Poor little ones. My heart bleeds, especially since I couldn’t be there to personally extend my help. I just had to hug my kids after reading this. :-(

In the light of the misery and hunger going on in many parts of Visayas, I guess it’s OK if all of us seated in our comfy chairs get “traumatized” a little bit…

Photo by Danny Pata.

Tulfo: I saw people walking aimlessly like zombies.

By 

I was not prepared for the scenes of suffering that would haunt me for the rest of my life as we landed at the Tacloban City airport.

I had formed a medical and mercy mission of 12 doctors from St. Luke’s Hospital and six nonmedical people, including myself, that landed in the city three days after Supertyphoon “Yolanda” struck. One doctor had backed out so we became a 17-member mission.

From the air, the once-bustling city of more than 200,000 people looked desolate. Everything was a total mess. It was as if an atomic bomb had been dropped.

As the Philippine Airlines (PAL) plane prepared to land, I saw people walking aimlessly like zombies.

Navy Capt. Roy Vincent Trinidad, officer in charge of the airport, asked our group—the first nongovernment medical mission to set foot in Eastern Visayas after Yolanda struck—if we wanted to go to Guiuan in Eastern Sámar. The place was supposedly more devastated than Tacloban.

He offered to take us to Guiuan—three hours by car on a normal day from Tacloban—on a helicopter.

Dr. Sammy Tanzo, head of the medical side of the mission, said our group should just stay in the premises of the airport—then crawling with soldiers and police—for security reasons.

Read more: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/527527/tulfo-i-saw-people-walking-aimlessly-like-zombies#ixzz2keJCQFT0
Follow us: @inquirerdotnet on Twitter | inquirerdotnet on Facebook

November 8, 2013 will forever be etched in the annals of Philippine History, a tragic date that will never be forgotten.

The Filipino Spirit vs. Yolanda and the Bojol tremors: brief thoughts from a historical viewpoint

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The Filipino Spirit vs. Yolanda and the Bojol tremors: brief thoughts from a historical viewpoint

Before 1565, we were a disunited bunch. Filipinas as we know it today (as Luzón, Visayas, and Mindanáo) did not exist yet during that time. And it is with certainty that Taclobanons back then were only concerned with their own territory and people. But so it was with Tagalogs, Cebuanos, Bicolanos, and all the rest of the ethnolinguistic tribes that were soon destined to become part of the Filipino nation. Noóng unang panahón, caniá-caniá talagá silá. Each group were concerned only with their internal affairs because each thought of themselves as independent.

But after 1565, all these tribes became ONE NATION. It was our CHRISTIAN FAITH which binded us into ONE PEOPLE. That is why all of us, whether we are in Aparri or in Joló, wept and grieved when the island province of Bojol fell under the mercy of last month’s killer tremors. And now we have the heartwrenching aftermath of Yolanda‘s deadly wrath to contend with. Much of the Visayas region was ravaged by devastating winds never thought to have been possible before. But among the towns and cities that were affected, it was the historic city of Tacloban in Leyte Province, “Ang Puso ng Silañgang Cabisayaan” (The Heart of Eastern Visayas), that was totally destroyed.

So even though many Filipinos have never been to either Bojol or Tacloban, they all feel the same pain and anguish that Bojolanos and Taclobanons feel now because through centuries of Filipinization, they have become our brother Filipinos. They are no longer Waray, and we are no longer Tagalog, Cebuano, Bicolano, etc. We are simply Filipinos as created by the FAITH bequeathed to us by Our Lord and Savior. We have become ONE FILIPINO nation because of our FAITH.

No wonder why, even though our archipielago is a Babel of tongues and microcultures, we do not hesitate to help each other in times of distress. Just like what is occurring at this very moment (it would have been unimaginable before 1565 that a Tagalog would be helping a Visayan and vice versa).

And rest assured that with this FAITH of ours, we shall rise again, in the same manner that it created our unified spirit in 1565…

¡Un gran saludo al espíritu filipino!

Was super typhoon Yolanda man-made?

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Admittedly, I do pay attention to conspiracy theories but only those which concern my country. Go ahead and kill me.

Nowadays, people usually think of conspiracy theorists as ingenious loonies locked for hours inside their dingy rooms crammed with books, documents, and Elvis Presley photos scattered all over the floor, seated in front of their computers while feasting on oily burgers and sugary coffee. Holier-than-thou keyboard warriors often make fun of such people due to the seeming hilarity of their pronouncements as opposed to an already accepted political dogma. But a friend of mine said that not too long ago, conspiracy theory was not categorized as a “science of screwballs”. Most, if not all, of these people are highly respected individuals. Pure geniuses and not just smarter than the average bear. But due to the polemics brought about by their discoveries, the powers that be are compelled to marginalize them just to remain in control of the weak. So there you have it, in a jiffy.

Anyway, if conspiracy theorists claim that super typhoon Yolanda originated from the U.S. military as implied in the scientifically articulate video above, then I believe them. After all, it is already common knowledge that the U.S. Government is power-hungry. Now THAT is no conspiracy theory.

Because if cloud seeding and birth control are made possible, why not artificial typhoons?

You be the judge.

Looting in typhoon-devastated Tacloban

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The streets of Taclóban City in Leyte were in chaos Saturday as several residents began looting grocery stores and breaking into shops for food and other basic items they needed to survive in the aftermath of typhoon Yolanda.
Video footage recorded by the team of GMA News correspondent Jiggy Manícad showed several men breaking into what appeared to be the storage area of a grocery store in the city and grabbing as much bread and softdrinks bottles as they can get.
Manicad said some residents have even resorted to forcibly entering fast food shops and destroying ATMs to get food and cash.
Click here for the rest of this news article. And click here to watch the video.
http://diversityhuman.com/hollywood/index.php/Friend-Blogs/tacloban-typhoon-victims-robbed-steal-gaisano-mall-goods

“…sana po ang armed forces macapagpadala po ng fuerza…
—Ted Failón—

“What breakdown of “law and order”? When people are starving and the government cannot do anything, it’s their right to take over supermarkets and malls to distirbute food and feed themselves. They should really do it in an organized manner that can provide equitable distribution to all the needy.”
—Sonny Melencio, Chairperson of the Partido Lakas ng Masa

“Whose law and whose order are we supposed to protect? This is not looting. These are the people trying to protect themselves from an uncaring and murderous system — a system that kills. We should call for the people to take over supermarkets, rice depots and so on, and take control of food and relief distribution themselves. Not looting. It’s wealth distribution.”
—Reihana Mohideen, Chairperson of Transform Asia

“Thou shalt not steal.”
—Exodus 20:15—

“And behold one came and said to him: Good master, what good shall I do that I may have life everlasting? Who said to him: Why asketh thou me concerning good? One is good, God. But if thou wilt enter into life, keep the commandments. He said to him: Which? And Jesus said: thou shalt do no murder, thou shalt not commit adultery, thou shalt not steal, thou shalt not bear false witness.”
—Matthew 19:16-18—

Fire destroys 400-year-old San Pedro Apóstol Church in Vinzons, Camarines Norte…

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This is horrible. Just horrible… Somebody has to be held accountable in order for this not to happen again!

Fire destroys 400-year-old church in Bicol

December 26, 2012 9:27 a.m.

A fire believed caused by an electrical overload destroyed a 400-year-old church in Camarines Norte province before dawn Wednesday.

The fire destroyed the San Pedro Apóstol church in Vinzons town, according to a report by radio dzBB’s Bícol affiliate.Parish priest Fr. Francisco Regala Jr. said the fire occurred between 1 and 2 a.m., adding they were not able to save the church’s historical artifacts.An initial investigation showed the fire started at the convent library and spread to the other parts of the church.

The fire reached the second alarm before it was put out at 5:30 a.m. Arson investigators are verifying information the fire stemmed from an electrical overload.

The report said the church was built in 1611. — LBG, GMA News

Iglesia de San Pedro Apóstol, Vinzons, Camarines Norte (photo courtesy of Pinoy Adventurista).

Sayang at di co pa mandín naquita itó. At the very least, this sacred heritage site was able to celebrate its last Christmas…

Many churches all over the Philippines have experienced the same fate during the Spanish, US, and Japanese eras. Even in modern times, accidental fires happen. But this is the first time that I’ve heard a heritage site to be gutted down by fire in modern times. Reckless, indeed.

Here in La Laguna province where I live, the churches of Biñán, Los Baños, and Liliw suffered the same tragedy. Nevertheless, they were able to rise from the ashes. Among the three mentioned, Liliw is a fine example. It was gutted down during the Tagalog rebellion sometime in 1898. It was reconstructed and was able to revive its Filhispanic architecture.

I pray that the San Pedro Apóstol Church in Vinzons, Camarines Norte would be able to revive its Baroque-style architecture soon. And in the new historical marker, they may add 26 December 2012 as an infamous date in the church’s four-century existence.

I wonder if this accident also happens in heritage sites abroad.

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