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124th birth anniversary of Claro M. Recto

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On the occasion of his 124th birth anniversary, FILIPINO eSCRIBBLES would like to pay tribute to one of the greatest Filipino thinkers of modern times, the late senator Claro M. Recto. Here is a brief biographical sketch of the Tayabeño nationalist written by Antonino V. Mico (from the 1965 book Eminent Filipinos which was published by the National Historical Commission, a precursor of today’s National Historical Commission of the Philippines).

CLARO M. RECTO
(1890-1960)

Senator Claro M. Recto is known as a statesman, a constitutionalist, a jurist, internationalist, parliamentarian, poet, scholar, linguist, patriot, and nationalist. He was born on February 8, 1890, in Tiáong, Tayabas (now Quezon), the son of Claro Recto, Sr., and Micaéla Mayo, of Lipâ, Batangas. He obtained his elementary education in Lipâ and in his home town.

As a young man, he was endowed with a marvelous mind, an active imagination, a venturesome spirit, and a firm determination to stick to his personal convictions. At 19, he was already a holder of the Bachelor of Arts degree from the Ateneo de Manila; and at 24, he obtained his Master of Laws degree from the University of Santo Tomás. In 1914, he was admitted to the Philippine bar and was licensed to practice law as a profession.

Recto’s political career began in 1916, when he served as legal adviser to the Philippine Senate. In 1919, he was elected representative from Batangas and served as House minority floor leader until 1925. In 1924, he went to the United States as member of the Parliamentary Independence Mission. He was admitted to the bar in the United States in 1924.

Upon his return to the Philippines, he founded the Demócrata Party, which served as a political thorn to the leadership of Manuel L. Quezon, when the latter was head of the Nacionalista Party and President of the Senate. He was elected senator for the first time in 1931 as a Demócrata and served as minority floor leader for three years.  In 1934, he became majority floor leader and President pro tempore of the Senate. He resigned his Senate seat when President Roosevelt appointed him Associate Justice in the Supreme Court in place of Justice Thomas Street, who retired. He left the Supreme Court in 1941 as a Nacionalista and again in 1953 as guest candidate of the Liberal Party. He ran as an independent Nacionalista candidate for President of the Philippines in the national elections of 1957, but lost.

Considered one of his immortal achievements in public life was his presidency of the Constitutional Convention, which drafted the Philippine Constitution, the first requirement towards the establishment of the Philippine Commonwealth regime.

Recto was a brilliant poet, satirist, and author. He wrote such law books as The Law of Belligerent OccupationValidity of Payments During Enemy OccupationThree Years of Enemy Occupation, several one-act plays in Spanish, and a collection of poems. He was a recipient of the Zóbel Prize for literature and an honored member of the Royal Academy of Jurisprudence and Legislation, of the Royal Academy of Arts and Sciences, and of the Academia Filipina de la Lengua Española.

The then President Carlos P. García appointed Recto Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary on the goodwill and cultural mission to Europe and South America in August, 1960. He was also appointed delegate to the 9th conference of the World Parliament Association in Venice in September, 1960, and was elected vice-president.

While giving a news conference in Rome, Recto suffered a heart attack from which he never recovered. He died in October 2, 1960.

Regarding his death, not a few historians believe that the great poet-turned-politician did not merely suffer from a heart attack. There’s this one interesting account from Raymond Bonner’s 1987 book Waltzing With A Dictator (pp. 41-42) that I’d like to share:

Transplanting democracy meant going after (Ramón) Magsaysay’s domestic political opponents, the most effective of whom was Senator Claro M. Recto, as unrelenting in his opposition to American foreign policy in the region as Magsaysay was slavish in following it. Recto, who was proud of his complete collection of Foreign Affairs, considered himself not anti-American but pro-Philippine. He criticized the bases agreement on the grounds, correctly, that the U.S. agreements under NATO and with other countries were far more favorable to the host country than was the U.S. arrangement in the Philippines. In Spain, the Spanish flag flew over the bases; in the Philippines, it was the American flag. When Washington claimed that the United States owned the lands on which the bases were situated, Recto prepared memorandums setting out the Philippine position that the United States had only leasehold rights, an argument eventually accepted by the United States. Recto was the “spearhead and brains of the national reawakening”.

The CIA set about to destroy Recto, who had been a principal drafter of the 1935 Constitution. It planted stories that he was a Communist Chinese agent who had been infiltrated into the Philippine Senate. To derail Recto’s electoral ambitions, the agency prepared packages of condoms, which it labeled “Courtesy of Claro M. Recto — The People’s Friend”. The condoms all had pinprick-size holes in them at the most inappropriate place. The agency went further. The CIA station chief, General Ralph B. Lovett, and the American Ambassador, Admiral Spruance, discussed assassinating Recto, going so far as to prepare a substance for poisoning him, an assassination plot that has not been publicly discussed before.

Recto wasn’t assassinated, the idea abandoned “for pragmatic consideration rather than moral scruples” (and with Lovett later suggesting that the bottle containing the poison was tossed into Manila Bay). He died of natural causes at the age of seventy.

It is hinted on this book that Recto was “assassinated” in Rome. Also, there have been persistent rumors that Recto did suffer a heart attack, but his medication was not given to him immediately which led to his very untimely death. Rumors they all may be, but there is a saying in Tagalog: “capág may usoc, may apóy” (when there’s smoke, there’s fire). Also, it is interesting to note that the place where he passed away was just a stopover. Recto was really on his way to Spain, the land of his mother tongue which is Spanish. He had never been there all his life, thus the excitement throbbing within his nationalistic spirit. He had already prepared a speech in Spanish, “Por los Fueros de una Herencia“, of which he was to deliver there upon arrival. But because of his demise, it remained unspoken.

The CIA knew that Recto delivering that speech in Spain would have proven catastrophic to their neocolonialistic ventures which were then in its early stages, as the Philippines was granted a phony independence 15 years earlier. That is why it was imperative for Recto to perish before he reached Spain.

One could just imagine what nationalistic and nostalgic fervor Recto would have sparked in Mother Spain had he delivered his speech there. Spain, who was robbed of her islands in the Pacific and the Americas in 1898, would have rekindled “righteous anger” into delivering, perhaps, the final blows of that war that should have ended justly and nobly. What fireworks his speech would have set upon the citizens of our Patria Grande! “Sayang” is all I could utter. Sayang…

Feliz cumpleaños, Don Claro. Tendré una botella de Cerveza Negra en su honor.

Expansionist Red China vs Imperialist Uncle Sam

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Red China vs the US WASPs? Yes. I hate sounding like a warmonger here, but it is bound to happen. It’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when. No two empires in history ever existed at the same time. So one must fall.

And their battleground? Hapless República de Filipinas, of course.

Relying on US support, the Philippines is so arrogant as to announce in the New Year that it will increase its navy and air force deployment at Zhongye Island, a Chinese island that it has illegally occupied for years.

It will be an intolerable insult to China

According to experts, the Chinese navy has drawn a detailed combat plan to seize the island and the battle will be restricted within the South China Sea.

Click here for more.

 

It would be sheer luck if no battle ever happens on any part of mainland Philippines. So better be prepared than sorry, that’s all I really wanted to say. Because looking back at our history, most government officials have “safe passages” to fly away anytime from this pork-barrel-riddled country of ours. And we poor commoners are the ones left behind to suffer for their governmental inadequacies, nay, dumbfoundedness and sheer stupidity and cowardice. Well, there’s always an exception, such as the regime of Governor General Simón de Anda (1701-1776).  Hindí nang-iiuan. But that’s another story from another time, when our national identity was at its peak.

It’s hopeless. We are no match against China, of course. And our puppet government has no other choice but to kowtow to Uncle Sam’s every military whim and fancy. Because war is big business. At this point, all we can do is pray and blog and complain and provide some good ‘ol pep talk…

We are mere ants compared to the big boot that is Red China. But they should remember that ants bite back. And the sting lingers.

We are mere dogs chained to our U.S. neocolonial masters. But they should remember that dogs bite back. When we do, it’s usually rabid.

We can easily be defeated, there is no doubt to that. Our military might is a joke; it has become a sham ever since Ferdinand Marcos was ousted unceremoniously. But in the end, the Filipino spirit will never falter. Defiantly.

I don’t usually swear, but right now… I am REALLY angry. So fuck you both, China and US. My middle finger salutes you. Be proud.

The Filipino Spirit vs. Yolanda and the Bojol tremors: brief thoughts from a historical viewpoint

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The Filipino Spirit vs. Yolanda and the Bojol tremors: brief thoughts from a historical viewpoint

Before 1565, we were a disunited bunch. Filipinas as we know it today (as Luzón, Visayas, and Mindanáo) did not exist yet during that time. And it is with certainty that Taclobanons back then were only concerned with their own territory and people. But so it was with Tagalogs, Cebuanos, Bicolanos, and all the rest of the ethnolinguistic tribes that were soon destined to become part of the Filipino nation. Noóng unang panahón, caniá-caniá talagá silá. Each group were concerned only with their internal affairs because each thought of themselves as independent.

But after 1565, all these tribes became ONE NATION. It was our CHRISTIAN FAITH which binded us into ONE PEOPLE. That is why all of us, whether we are in Aparri or in Joló, wept and grieved when the island province of Bojol fell under the mercy of last month’s killer tremors. And now we have the heartwrenching aftermath of Yolanda‘s deadly wrath to contend with. Much of the Visayas region was ravaged by devastating winds never thought to have been possible before. But among the towns and cities that were affected, it was the historic city of Tacloban in Leyte Province, “Ang Puso ng Silañgang Cabisayaan” (The Heart of Eastern Visayas), that was totally destroyed.

So even though many Filipinos have never been to either Bojol or Tacloban, they all feel the same pain and anguish that Bojolanos and Taclobanons feel now because through centuries of Filipinization, they have become our brother Filipinos. They are no longer Waray, and we are no longer Tagalog, Cebuano, Bicolano, etc. We are simply Filipinos as created by the FAITH bequeathed to us by Our Lord and Savior. We have become ONE FILIPINO nation because of our FAITH.

No wonder why, even though our archipielago is a Babel of tongues and microcultures, we do not hesitate to help each other in times of distress. Just like what is occurring at this very moment (it would have been unimaginable before 1565 that a Tagalog would be helping a Visayan and vice versa).

And rest assured that with this FAITH of ours, we shall rise again, in the same manner that it created our unified spirit in 1565…

¡Un gran saludo al espíritu filipino!

Hispanity Day

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To my fellow Filipinos: be aware, be PROUD, of who and what you really are.

“To accuse the Spanish, over and over again, of having brought us all sorts of things, mostly evil, among which we can usually remember nothing very valuable, ‘except, perhaps,’ religion and national unity, is equivalent to saying of a not very model mother, that she has given her child nothing except life, for in the profoundest possible sense, Spain did give birth to us — as a nation, as an historical people. This geographical unit of numberless islands called the Philippines –this mystical unit of numberless tongues, bloods and cultures called a Filipino– was begotten of Spain, is a Spanish creation. The content of our national destiny is ours to create, but the basic form, the temper, the physiognomy, Spain has created for us.”

–Nick Joaquín (La Naval de Manila, October 1943)–

You can’t continue being a Filipino if you continue harboring a hatred of our Spanish past. That glorious epoch is what created us.

 ¡Feliz Día de la Hispanidad! :D

Drawing up our islands

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Asked about his country’s culture, brief history, and other Frenchy stuff while on a drinking session somewhere in Alabang, this former French officemate of mine readily obliged and even gamely drew up a crude sketch of his country on a large piece of tissue paper!

Me and the rest of our Filipino coworkers drinking with him were amazed at how he did it. And by the look on his face, he was a bit puzzled at our admiration. It’s because drawing a sketch of their country was something normal to him, to all of them there in France. Probably the same thing with other countries. Which led me to think: how many schools here in our country do even care to teach our students how to draw our archipelago, or at least make a more or less accurate crude sketch of it?

It’s understandable, though, that in comparison, France is a bit easier to draw than the Filipino archipelago: it’s compact and a bit squarish despite the irregularities on the sides. Our country, of course, is composed of thousands of jigsaw-puzzle shaped islands and islets. Other than that, not everyone has the talent to draw (the only stuff I know to draw is a bamboo stick). But should this be an excuse? In my alma mater, all students, regardless of their course, are required to take up Basic Inorganic Chemistry even though all of them (especially in my case) never intended to build their careers inside a test-tube-filled laboratory. And all high school students (not sure if it’s still the same with college) are still required to undergo basic military training. The point of it all, of course, is to help shape a well-rounded and (hopefully) multifaceted Filipino student.

Will the skill to draw our archipelago help contribute to that? Yes, I believe so. It will inculcate in them not just a knowledge of their country’s visual representation but also a sense of ownership, if not nationalism. And following a sense of ownership is responsibility. Like what environmentalists usually say about our planet, Filipinas is our only home; we have to take care of it, guard it, and defend it at all times.

With all this senseless and bigoted Islamic claim of the entire island of Mindanáo (not to mention China’s nincompoopish claim over OUR Spratlys and the Scarborough Shoal), may our educational system not wait until our country is composed only of Luzón and Visayas before they thought of inculcating geographical awareness and pride among our students.

*******

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Webster defines what a Filipino is

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The Webster’s Encyclopedic Unabridged Dictionary of the English Language (New York: Portland House, 1989), of which I have a copy, correctly defines what a Filipino is:

Fil·i·pi·no (fil’əˈpē’nō), n., pl. -nos, adj. —n. 1. a native of the Philippines, esp. a member of a Christianized native tribe. —adj. 2. Philippine. [< Sp. derived from (las Islas) Filipinas Philippine (islands)]

Take note of  the phrase “a member of a Christianized native tribe”. This is historically precise because it was the Spanish friars who, upon baptizing the indigenous, automatically Hispanized them. We say automatically because the once pagan indigenous were assimilated into the societies (reducciones which later became pueblos, parroquias, etc.) that were created by the friars for them. In other words, those who were baptized or Christianized were welcomed into a new society which provided them the benefits of cultural dissemination, in a way “civilizing” them because  new concepts and tools from the West were by far and comparatively more advanced vis-à-vis the latter’s cultural way of life.

From these baptized ethnolinguistic groups or tribes evolved the Filipino.

In this regard, it is scientifically, culturally, and historically imprecise to say that the Ifugáos, the Mañguianes, the Aetas, the T’bolis, even the Moros, and all the other unbaptized ethnolinguistic groups to be called Filipinos for the mere reason that they did not assimilate themselves into the societies that could have shaped and molded them into the Filipino cosmos that was the world of José Rizal, Marcelo H. del Pilar, Padre José Burgos, Luis Rodríguez Varela, and the rest.

This Webster definition is the reason why, in a previous blogpost (Filipino, in a jiffy), I named only three attributes which defined what a Filipino is:

1) Hispanic culture, with Malayo-Polynesian elements as a substrate.
2) The Spanish language.
3) Christianity (Roman Catholic Religion).

The indigenous who never got the chance to be baptized into the Christian faith were not Hispanized, thus failing to be Filipinized in the process. Of course, we can still say that the rest —particularly our indigenous brothers— are Filipinos. But only by virtue of citizenship (most notably, jus soli).

Happy 442nd birthday, Filipinas!

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Today we should celebrate not only Manila’s foundation date; today is also the 442nd birthday of our country! Because Manila was founded as the CAPITAL city on 24 June 1571.

Take note that I put emphasis on the word CAPITAL.

Remember that Manila was founded and established as the CAPITAL CITY on this date 442 years ago. Because it is a fact that the Filipino State (el Estado Filipino) was simultaneously founded with the establishment of Manila as capital city on 24 June 1571. Think about this: why in the world should there be a CAPITAL CITY —the seat of a central government with laws— WITHOUT a corresponding State to govern in the first place?

Our history teachers and books often teach us that Manila was founded on 24 June 1571 as the capital city. And just that. Nothing else follows. The question now is: the capital city of WHAT?! Logic dictates that if there is a capital city, naturally there should be a state that it has to govern, and it doesn’t even matter if this state is a colony or and independent one. These history teachers and books always fail to teach us that with the establishment of Manila as the city capital, the founding of the Filipino State was also established.

And it is wrong to say that 12 June 1898 is the birth of our country. The existence of our country did not happen overnight. It had to evolve from something else. Here is an analogy: my alma mater, Adamson University, is now 81 years old. But it did not immediately start as a university. It was first founded in 1932 as the Adamson School of Industrial Chemistry. It only achieved university status in 1941. Should we now say that there was no Adamson before 1941? In the same vein, should we say that there was no Filipinas before 1898?

Happy 44nd birthday, Filipinas!!! :D

Doy Laurel in history

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Today’s version of democracy seems to be more conducive to trade liberalization, an unfair economic setup that benefits only imperialist powers such as the US and China. Never smaller economies such as the one we have. Democracy is like a dinner plate in which to put capitalist grub on. It only fosters gobble-ization. That is why I no longer support it.

But back in the days when Martial Law was the golden calf, democracy must have probably been the best antidote to that era’s political strife. It was, in a way, excusable, an adhesive bandage sort of thing, just to stop the nation from bleeding further. Salvador “Doy” Laurel et al. realized that when they organized the United Democratic Opposition, later to be known as the United Nationalist Democratic Organization (UNIDO), at the onset of the 80s. UNIDO served as the catalyst to the political upheavals during the crucial first half of that decade. It later chose Doy to be its standard bearer to challenge strongman Ferdinand Marcos in the 1986 polls. Eventually, however, the reins of the lead war horse was given to recently widowed Corazón “Cory” Aquino.

And the rest, as they always say, is history.

Since then, the nation has been celebrating the victory of democracy every 25th of February, the day Marcos stepped down from Washington’s satellite office which we all know as the Malacañang Palace. Commemorations here, there, and everywhere, toasting the personalities involved—both the self-proclaimed and the wannabes—in Marcos’s downfall, and all that Pinoy hullabaloo we all get from the media all the time the EDSA People Power crops up on our calendars. Sin, Aquino, Marcos, Enrile. These are the familiar names we always hear every February 25. We could just use their initials and come up with SAME to keep it short and simple.

But what of the others? What of Doy the artist and genuine statesman? What happened to UNIDO? Why are they rarely discussed in an important historical event such as the one we’re commemorating today? Unbeknownst to many, the Laurel-led UNIDO was the sole opposition force to defy the Marcos regime when the dictator’s main rival, Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino, left for the US in 1980 for his heart bypass. The proceeding videos (shown last week in Global News Network‘s Republika ni Érik Espina) provide some answers coming from Doy’s grandchildren: José L. Delgado IV and rock artist Nicole L. Asensio:

ESPINA: Do you ever wonder why his name isn’t in the history books as it should be?

DELGADO: My personal opinion is because the winners write history. The winners are the ones who have a final say as to what is put inside the history books.

Right on, hitting the proverbial nail on its head. But Nicole pretty much sums up why their grandfather and UNIDO are rarely discussed, if at all, in history classes and other EDSA-Revolution-related topics: media is controlled.

That strong statement rattled the host a little, provoking him to say that she’s been saying so many things already. Fodder for conspiracy theorists, one might say (guilty much?). However, the term conspiracy theory was originally meant for those who secretly conspire to accomplish something vile before that term was made synonymous to Jerry-Fletcher type characters. But enough of that. The Laurel cousins’ matter-of-factly statements have now invoked a lot of questions. Who controls the media? And why the cold-shoulder treatment given to Doy? Is it because he opposed Marcos out of  principle rather than on a personal level (they were very good friends before the Martial Law years)? Or is it because the powers-that-be could simply not stomach another potential headache, something that they never experienced with the yellow crowd (whose heroine, by the way, once called Doy a “lañgao” or “fly”)?

If you will ask me, I’d prefer an artist, an idealist, a statesman, a writer over a politician to lead this country. A philosopher king, as Plato would have it. Because a life focused on politics tends to debase the mind. But the arts refine the soul and the celestial spheres.

*******

Have I said too much as well? Because of the foregoing, I am now inclined to publish Bongbong Marcos’s EDSA People Power Revolution statement published a few hours ago in his official Facebook fan page (because the content simply makes pure sense):

Good evening Facebook friends!

It’s that time of the year again (EDSA 1 Anniversary) which, as time goes by, must get more confusing for those that were too young to appreciate history in the making. There’s been a lot of talk about “historical revisionism” as of late, and the need to “get the story ‘right’ for future generations.” As to who holds the “complete and accurate story”, perhaps, belongs to one or two protagonists no longer alive, or a historian that is yet to be born. There is a scramble from many sides to validate their respective points of view through books, documentary films, theatre, TV ”specials” (propaganda) with their endless re-runs, and all kinds of media. I have often stated that a complete and accurate picture of events leading up to EDSA 1 will only be possible when passions have died down and vested interests, political expediencies, and propaganda machineries, are no longer present.

Additionally, there is another way of propagating one’s version of history and that is through legislation, thus, including it in the annals of the State’s statutes that are usually archived in protected government buildings, and classified as “official” for future historians to take note of. In today’s world, they may be stored, too, in some internet “cloud,” either in government computer servers or in a third party cloud provider’s data center.

Recently, a bill was ratified by Congress called the “Human Rights Victims Reparation and Recognition Act of 2013″ which among other things, grants compensation to the victims of human rights violations during Martial Law up to 1986. In as far as compensating human rights victims is concerned, I, personally, have no problem with that. As a legislator, I did not participate in the discussions and deliberations on the bill knowing very well the futility of my views being heard without people presuming me biased. Some parts of the bill, nevertheless, are by themselves reasonable and more importantly, are fittingly imbued with compassion. However, it begs some questions to be asked: what about the other human rights victims of the last 27 years? Why did the legislators have a mind to address the human rights issue selectively? Why differentiate between a person tortured in the 70s and one tortured in the 90s? By default, the victims of human rights violations from 1987 onward get nothing in compensation for the atrocities they suffered solely because they happened under another administration. To treat their situations with less concern and sympathy is blatantly and cruelly discriminatory and unjust. The bill also ignored the soldiers of the Republic that were captured, tortured, and pitilessly killed by insurgents during the same period that the bill covers — 1972 to 1986. Wives of brave soldiers were widowed at very young ages and their children, made fatherless. The legitimate human rights victims during Martial Law deserve the compensation they will get but why should the other likewise legitimate human rights victims not deserve it, too? Do not these “tradpols” sense the weariness of our people when listening to the same voices pontificate from their podiums blind, by choice, to the fact that their audience are still mired in poverty, joblessness, and privation? And that their only wish is for their lives to improve as was promised to them 27 long years ago and still, they wait. These same politicians are wont to cover up the fact that nothing much has changed since 1986 and they do this by resurrecting old bugaboos, and reviving hackneyed and over-used excuses and scapegoats. The fact is, twenty-seven years later, the chasm between the rich and the poor has widened, and poverty has become more widespread.

Moreover, for those that make the lame comparison between the Martial Law years and the Holocaust, they could be offending the Jews without knowing it with their lack of sensitivity and plenty of nincompoopery. There are Generals and other high ranking officers of the AFP during the 70′s who are still alive today. They can correct me if I’m wrong on whether they implemented and enforced, as heads of their respective commands in the AFP, a state-sponsored, systematic mass execution akin to the holocaust where ten million people were killed in gas chambers and by starvation.

The “freedom fighters”, both the self proclaimed and the wannabes, will say we have a liberated press today and I, too, join them in celebrating “freedom of the press”, and I hasten to add, that should include the Internet. Yet, strangely enough, the Philippines has only recently been called “the most dangerous country, not at war, to live in for a journalist”. This was never the case at anytime up to 1986; so, though we may have a free press today, the extraordinarily high number of murdered journalists that gave us the notorious label of “most dangerous” as aforementioned above, occurred many years after 1986 and the killings have continued unabated to this day. Again, these victims, from the ranks of media no less, have not been given the attention they deserve.

Conclusively, the obvious and glaring question is: what about the tens of thousands of human rights victims of the post Marcos era — the last twenty seven years? That question is like an “elephant in the room” that some politicians, the typically glib, sanctimonious, and self righteous, pretend not to see. In addressing only the human rights violations from 1972 to 1986, a total of 14 years, and ignoring the thousands of documented violations that were committed in the last 27 years (that’s double the number of years covered by the bill), what emerges from that is a writing on the wall that screams: POLITICS. The people have seen twenty seven years go by with no substantial changes in their lives; in fact, millions have had to leave their families to seek work abroad. More politics is the last thing they need from their leaders.

The level of politics in this country has become such that when I ran for Senator some three years ago, there were a few that vigorously campaigned against my election, urging the people to make sure that I would not be elected or we would again be placed under Martial Law. Firstly, I ran for Senator and not for President; and secondly, the act of declaring Martial Law is not genetic in nature. There is a saying that goes: “never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity.” You can add to that: “though it could be both”.

Either way, I have chosen to ignore such attacks coming from politicians, the “tradpol” types and those that will use this law to reinvent themselves as “freedom fighters against tyranny”. I will continue to focus on ways to unify our country, specially among our youth, and help in creating a more egalitarian society, and a developed and inclusive economy — a goal that is simple, yet formidable and daunting, but achievable. Last year’s GDP was a significant improvement over the dismal year before, and we should commend the administration for that. My unsolicited advice, though, is that job creation and ways of attracting more FDIs should be undertaken incessantly and relentlessly and if we can manage significant progress in both, then we can look forward to a sustainable year-after-year growth that will be felt by everyone; and that it be “felt by everyone” is the crucial and essential metric. We need that 6.6% GDP to trickle down. Enough of the politics that divide us,the “blame game” that delays us, and the excuses that derail us. The people are sick and tired of it, the young are baffled by, and frustrated with it; and ultimately, it does not put food on the plates of the hungry nor does it create jobs. So I hope this 27th anniversary not be again a celebration of polarization or division. It’s time to focus, move forward, and get things done as one indivisible nation. Maraming salamat pô. ¡Mabuhay ang Filipino!

Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos, Jr.

“History belongs to the youth, the
largest and most idealistic and energetic segment of our
population.”

The North American Invasion of the Philippines Continues

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Below is a grueling exposé of how the evil US military forces have once again occupied our nation.

THE NORTH AMERICAN INVASION OF THE PHILIPPINES CONTINUES

José Miguel García

From identifying ourselves with our nation in the 1900s when we were a newly born nation, we had reverted back to identifying ourselves with only ourselves, our family, or our clan just like when we were not yet a nation before the 1600s. An indication of how we identified ourselves with our nation was demonstrated in a letter by Ellis G. Davis, Company A, 20th Kansas about us in the 1900s: “They will never surrender until their whole race is exterminated. They are fighting for a good cause, and the Americans should be the last of all nations to transgress upon such rights. Their independence is dearer to them than life…”1

Today, the North Americans of the United States continue to violate our nationhood. The difference is that today, we Filipinos continue to defend their violation.

In the 1960s, the United States of the North Americans provided landing facilities inside their base here in the Philippines to the Air Force of Great Britain during our conflict against the latter over the Sabah territorial dispute.2

There is now a US military base inside the camp of the AFP Western Mindanáo Command yet the AFP has no control over it. Filipino soldiers among us do not have access inside without permit from the US occupational forces. As of this day, we have no control of foreigners like the North Americans of the United States on what they do in our own country. The senate rejection of the US bases in the Philippines in 1991 is only true within our minds. But they are not true beyond our minds.3

On July 2002, a Filipino among us, Buyong-buyong Isnijal was shot by US Sgt. Reggie Lane in Tuburan, Basilan.4 In November 30, 2007, North American occupational forces led by a certain Master Sgt. Ronburg ordered the staff of the Panamáo District Hospital in Panamáo, Sulú to shut down operations after sundown, threatening to shoot us if they did not follow his orders. Filipino military officers among us were impotent in leading our forces to defend us Filipinos in that part of the country against such violation of our nationhood. This deprived 40,000 among us Filipinos of that area, of medical care every night for around one month.5 The commission on human rights and the Sulú Desk reported on the involvement of US troops in the wanton carnage and absolute mayhem of nine filipinos which included a Philippine Army soldier on vacation, a pregnant woman, a four-year-old, and a nine-year-old in Ipil, Maimbung, Sulú on February 4, 2008. The provincial governor denounced this atrocity.6,7,8

A certain Filipino military official of Western Mindanáo Command admitted that he disapproves the practice of higher-ranking Filipino officials among us saluting lower ranking US troops or acting as bodyguards for them.9 Another Filipino official among us, Philipine Navy Lt. Nancy Gadián also told the media that US troops behavior towards Filipino soldiers even of higher rank is that of a human master towards a dog.10

Under these circumstances is the official mission of the US military in the Philippines today: to train us Filipino soldiers hardened for decades of combat against terrorists in a jungle, in a hot and humid tropical environment, home-ground of the latter who have also been veterans as well as slippery in-fighting and, most notably, have been products of CIA-directed: recruitment; training; funding, and; combat experience in engaging Soviet paratroopers in the deserts and mountains of Afghanistan during the US-caused Afghan-Soviet War.11,12 What combat skills, techniques, and tactics will the US soldiers with less experience in these types of combat and terrain than we have as we have been directly involved with for decades, can they teach us?13,14

In Vietnam, they lost. In Afghanistan, they were never generally engaged in the daily face to face battles in every corner of the local terrain.15 In Iraq, they engaged their enemies with heavy reliance on massive technology and firepower only after they have softened defenders in their homegrounds after they have intervened in the domestic social affairs processes. Aside from local insurgents with which their original motive they corrupted, the US also transmitted local insurgent looking foreigners to increase the strength of the local insurgents. It is these insurgents who were generally engaged in the daily face-to-face battles in every corner of the physical and social terrain with the enemies of the United States of the North Americans. What they achieved in the Middle East was that they were able to destroy their supposedly military enemies only after they have destroyed the whole of the nation of their enemies. It is this whole nation who happened to be the collateral damage — a term they very often used conveniently. Therefore, it is not so much the combat techniques and tactics that they can teach us. Rather, it is their brand of military strategy —the whole of the subject nation being destroyed in order to destroy the subject enemy— that they can teach. The Abu Sayyaf issue is just one of the results of the CIA creation of religious fighters from Muslim regions including Mindanáo to fight a proxy war against the Soviets in Afghanistan. Based on US media reports themselves, Abu Sayyaf has a relationship with Al Qaeda which the US created to fight a proxy war in Afghanistan.16,17,18,19,20,21,22

A brother filipino, Gregan Cardeño, was recruited as a security guard with Skylink Security and General Services, an agency based in Zamboanga City and a subcontractor of DynCorp International, a contractor of the US military. On January 30, 2010, he signed a contract with the agency to work as a security guard for the American military personnel assigned to the Joint Special Operations Task Force-Philippines (JSOTF-P) in Maguindanáo. However, on February 1, 2010, Gregan was brought to the JSOTF-P military barracks of the North American of the United States occupying the Philippine Army’s 103rd Battalion Headquarters in Camp Ranao, Marawi City, to work not as a security guard but as an “interpreter” for the US troops. On February 3, 2010, inside the US facility in Marawi City, Gregan was reported to have died. The local police, headed by one SPO3 Ali Rangiris, told Carivel, the sister of Gregan, that when he arrived at the scene of the incident, he found the body of Gregan on the floor and the area already “contaminated.” Filipino investigators have been blocked by the North Americans of the United States occupational forces in Mindanáo to conduct investigation inside their facility. Captain Javier Ignacio of the Western Mindanáo Command helped the family of Cardeño in the investigation. On March 25, 2010, Capt. Ignacio was gunned down by unknown motorcycle-riding gunmen in March just before he was about to execute an affidavit regarding his knowledge about the circumstances of the death.23 A Filipina was gang-raped by members of the United States Marine Corps in Subic in 2005. The case however was dismissed inspite of the overwhelming evidences.24 Another Filipina whose name was hidden was raped by a North American in Macati City in April 2009. But due to fear of ending up like another case of Nicole, she did not charge her rapist in court.25

Are we already independent? Except for Carlos García, we never had any president who could not be controlled by the United States of North America and stay long as president.26 All these presidents are products of US-tampered development of our educational system. The guns are the tools of the North Americans to destroy our defenses and control our archipelago. The English language is the tool of the North Americans to destroy our identity and control our minds.27

This US control of our national developmental code is the cause of why despite of our Asian neighbors having already overtaken us in defense status today, despite of our having had an excellent defense system in 1898 up to the early 1900s, having been able to militarily maneuver for years against being caught, locked, and controlled by the world power US aggressor forces until they resorted to massive kidnapping and extermination of the civilians among us, and despite of decades of US pumping of military aid, training, guidance, and tutelage to us, we are still dependent on US and impotent in defending our nation against foreign invaders today.

Have we not been an invaded territory by the United States of the North Americans until today?

*******

ENDNOTES

1. Kipling, R. Letters from the Front: An Insight into the Filipino-American War
2. Vizmanos, D. 2002. Rejoinder to Pro-Balikatan Arguments. Bulatlat, Vol.2, Number 7. http://www.bulatlat.com/news/2-7/2-7-reader-vizmanos2.html
3. Citizens Peace Watch. 2008. Report of the Fact-Finding Mission to Zamboanga City and Sulu, pp. 3-6, 64. Quezon City.http://www.focusweb.org/philippines/docs/CPWReport.pdf
4. Conde, C. 2002. Terrified Basilan Woman Swears U.S. Soldier Shot Her Husband. Bulatlat.com. http://bulatlat.com/news/2-25/2-25-basilan.html
5. Alipala, J. 2007. Talks of U.S. Interventions Prompts Sulu Meetings. Philippine Daily Inquirer.http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/inquirerheadlines/regions/view/20071231-109541/Talk_of_US_intervention_prompts_Sulu_meetings
6. Citizens Peace Watch. 2008. Report of the Fact-Finding Mission to Zamboanga City and Sulu, pp. 6-9, 64. Quezon City.http://www.focusweb.org/philippines/docs/CPWReport.pdf
7. Alipala, J. 2008. Sulu ‘Massacre’ Survivor Claims Seeing U.S. Soldiers. Mindanao Bureau.http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/breakingnews/nation/view/20080207-117398/Sulu-massacre-survivor-claims-seeing-US-soldiers
8. Watson, P. 2008. U.S. role in Philippine raid questioned, Los Angeles Times.
9. Citizens Peace Watch. 2008. Report of the Fact-Finding Mission to Zamboanga City and Sulu, p. 10. Quezon City.http://www.focusweb.org/philippines/docs/CPWReport.pdf
10. Calonzo, A. 2009. U.S. Troops Joined Combat In Mindanao, Says Navy Wistleblower. GMANews.TV.http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/170796/news/nation/us-troops-joined-combat-in-mindanao-says-navy-whistleblower
11. Chossudovsky, M. 2002. The Nobel War Prize.http://globalresearch.ca/articles/CHO210B.html
12. Bengwayan, M. 2002. US Forces in the Philippines Facing CIA-Trained Abu Sayyaf Terrorists.http://www.officialconfusion.com/oldsite/terrorfiles/phillipines/abusayyaf.html
13. Citizens Peace Watch. 2008. Report of the Fact-Finding Mission to Zamboanga City and Sulu, p. 10. Quezon City.http://www.focusweb.org/philippines/docs/CPWReport.pdf
14. Vizmanos, D. 2002. Rejoinder to Pro-Balikatan Arguments. Bulatlat, Vol.2, Number 7. http://www.bulatlat.com/news/2-7/2-7-reader-vizmanos2.html
15. Blum, W. Afghanistan- 1979-1992: America’s Jihad. U.S. Military & CIA Interventions Since World War II. http://killinghope.org/
16. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dqn0bm4E9yw
17. http://www.yonip.com/main/articles/intervention.html, International Solidarity Mission, Statement of the, “Against U. S. Armed Intervention in the Philippines July 24-31, 2002,”
18. http://www.yonip.com/main/articles/philippines.html, A six-part series The United States in the Philippines: post-9/11 imperatives, By Larry Chin
19. James M, & Cooley J. 2001. The Abu Sayyaf-Al Qaeda Connection. ABC News. pp. 1-2. http://abcnews.go.com/International/story?id=79205&page=1#.T8i4KajLb-s
20. Chin, L. 2001. The Abu Sayyaf. The United States in the Philipines: Post 9/11 imperatives, Part 6, Yonip Library Section – Visiting Forces Agreement and Balikatan Exercises.
21. Santuario, E III. 2007. Abu Sayyaf: The CIA’s Monster Gone Berserk. Constantine Report. http://www.constantinereport.com/allposts/abu-sayyaf-the-cia%E2%80%99s-monster-gone-berserk/
22. Cooley, J. 1999. Unholy Wars: Afghanistan, America, and International Terrorism. Pluto Press, 345 Archway Road, London N6 5AA and 22883 Quicksilver Drive, Sterling, VA 20166-2012, USA
23. Zarate, C. I. 2012. Gregan. Philippine Daily Inquirer. Chino Roces Avenue corner Yague and Mascardo Streets, Makati City, Metro Manila, Philippines. http://opinion.inquirer.net/27799/gregan
24. Rodis, R. 2009. The Subic Rape Case. Inquirer.net.http://www.inquirer.net/specialreports/subicrapecase/view.php?db=1&article=20090509-203985
25. Olea, R. 2009. Another ‘Nicole’: Filipina Accuses US Marine of Rape; Case Heightens Junk-VFA Call. Bulatlat.com.http://bulatlat.com/main/2009/05/14/another-%E2%80%98nicole%E2%80%99-filipina-accuses-us-marine-of-rape/
26. Carlos P. García. Wikipedia.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlos_P._Garcia
27. http://thefilipinomind.blogspot.com/2006/03/making-of-americanized-filipino-minds.html

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