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Category Archives: Hope

¡Agradecemos a todos los que nos ayudaron!

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Aunque soy cristiano, tengo una tendencia a ser pesimista. Pero los acontecimientos recientes han restaurado completamente mi fe en la humanidad.

Tantas personas respondieron a mi petición de ayuda la semana pasada, y algunos de ellos ni siquiera hemos conocido aún en persona. Es la hora para mostrar mi humilde gratitud.

 

Yeyette en el hospital, un día después de su parto e histerectomía. Las flores son de mi hermana Jennifer.

 
Más de una docena de personas, de una u otra forma, nos ayudaron durante este episodio más difícil de nuestras vidas. De parte de mi mujer Jennifer “Yeyette” Perey de Alas, me gustaría dar mi agradecimiento especial a estos ángeles: mis hermanas Jennifer y Jessica, mi suegra Teresa Atienza de Perey y su paisana Jene Alfaro, mi suegro Jaime Perey, la Familia Catáquiz de San Pedro Tunasán (la srᵃ alcaldesa Lourdes Catáquiz, su marido Don Calixto Catáquiz, su hijo Aris Catáquiz, y su sobrino León Buenavista), mi tío Ramón Alas, el gran filipinista Señor Guillermo Gómez Rivera, Antonio Marques Sans (salimos del hospital principalmente a causa de él), Shee-Ann Meneses, Diego Pastor Zambrano, José-Rodaniel Cruz, Luis María Cardaba Prada, nuestra vecina Flor Junio de Pérez (por cuidar de nuestros otros niños durante nuestra estancia en el hospital), Ronald Yu, Sylvia Santos de Pineda (bisnieta de Marcelo H. del Pilar), Jennalyn Carmona y Jingky Sumañga (respectivamente del departamento de facturación y una enfermera de St. Clare’s Medical Center), y mi mejor amigo Arnaldo Arnáiz.
 
Gracias también a los médicos que trabajaron arduamente para salvar la vida de Yeyette: la ginecóloga obstetra Drᵃ Catherine Pujol de Azores y su cirujano marido Dr. Rouel Azores, el anestesiólogo Dr. Gerald Vita, y otra ginecóloga obstetra Drᵃ Orpha Montillano de Corrado.
 

Junífera Clarita en el cuarto del bebé del hospital.

 
Y por supuesto, mil gracias también a todos los innumerables y valiosos amigos y parientes nuestros que oraron por la seguridad y recuperación de mi mujer y nuestra nueva bebé, Junífera Clarita. ¡Muchas gracias a todos ustedes! Gracias por el apoyo y el aliento espiritual y moral. Yeyette ahora disfruta de su segunda vida en la Tierra con nuestros cinco hijos hermosos. Somos muy afortunados de tener a todos ustedes en nuestras vidas.
 

¡Hogar, dulce hogar!

 
¡Enaltecer la familia para la gloria más alta de Dios!

RH Law must win

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Not many people today know that hundreds of years ago, at a time when banking was still in its infancy, the Catholic Church fought the concept of interest. It lost that battle. Since then, poverty and misery became a horrible tandem, a terrifying economic force to reckon with. And since that defeat, the few filthy rich has occupied the zenith of society, lording us over with laws meant to stimulate and protect their illogical hunger for profit.

During the last century here in the Philippines, the local Catholic Church fought Republic Act No. 1425, more famously known as the Rizal Law. The law mandated that all educational institutions in the country must offer courses about the life and works of José Rizal. It lost that battle, too. Since then, Rizal and his Masonic novels (not exactly all of his works) have become the mouthpiece of anti-Catholicism and pro-liberalism.

And now, for the past few years, the Catholic Church in the Philippines is in another uphill battle, a battle that I expect it to lose. I am, of course, referring to Republic Act No. 10354, otherwise known as the Responsible Parenthood and Reproductive Health Act of 2012 or simply the RH Law. The final deliberations of the Supreme Court to decide on the constitutionality of the RH Law is about to end. And tomorrow they will reveal their final decision if this law should be upheld or repealed.

Looking back at the general history of the Catholic Church, I see that is has a disappointing win-loss record. Heck, even its Founder was humiliated in public, tortured, and then crucified to death. And do I even need to mention the countless martyrs that we have who died for Him? But I guess this rather humiliating win-loss record has been written in the stars. It should really end up that way.

If our Lord Jesus Christ suffered, was humiliated and persecuted, so must we His followers follow the same fate. Scary thought, but I think that’s the only way true Christians must go through on this realm in order to get to the next (and final) one. I see life now more like a video game: we play, we struggle, we lose, we fight in order to reach the next level. And upon reaching the next level, we play, we struggle, we lose again and again, but we stand up and fight once more in order to reach another much higher level (in the immortal words of Joana Angelica Romero: “And it goes on and on and on.” :D )

I think you guys should know what the final level is. And if we lose all our chances (or “lives” in video gaming parlance), well, it’s “Game Over” for all of us. Doón na papasoc sa escena si Mang Taníng.

In other words, we Christians must suffer, must be persecuted, in order for us to be “made worthy of the promises of Christ”. Besides, we do not stay here on Earth forever. So we might as well allow are enemies to persecute us, and we should remain humble about it (Matthew 5:5, 10).

As what pro-life leader Eric Manalang told me a few months ago: “…we have been and always will be fools for Christ… ahh, such sweet persecution.” (1 Corinthians 4:10). Now I understand what he meant.

This is not to say that we Christian Filipinos must give up the fight against the evils of the RH Law. Whether or not this law should win in the end, the most important matter is that we fought the good fight (2 Timothy 4:7), that we never gave up, that we stood up against it despite the overpowering odds.

Those who oppose us outnumber us, yes. They are the majority. But always remember this: Matthew 22:14. That is why I think that the RH Law must win this time, as with all the past enemies of the Holy Catholic Church.  If our Lord and Savior was fated to die to save us, so must be with the prophecy of a chosen few come through. :-)

But y’know what? I might even suffer a heart attack if ever the RH Law loses.

Expansionist Red China vs Imperialist Uncle Sam

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Red China vs the US WASPs? Yes. I hate sounding like a warmonger here, but it is bound to happen. It’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when. No two empires in history ever existed at the same time. So one must fall.

And their battleground? Hapless República de Filipinas, of course.

Relying on US support, the Philippines is so arrogant as to announce in the New Year that it will increase its navy and air force deployment at Zhongye Island, a Chinese island that it has illegally occupied for years.

It will be an intolerable insult to China

According to experts, the Chinese navy has drawn a detailed combat plan to seize the island and the battle will be restricted within the South China Sea.

Click here for more.

 

It would be sheer luck if no battle ever happens on any part of mainland Philippines. So better be prepared than sorry, that’s all I really wanted to say. Because looking back at our history, most government officials have “safe passages” to fly away anytime from this pork-barrel-riddled country of ours. And we poor commoners are the ones left behind to suffer for their governmental inadequacies, nay, dumbfoundedness and sheer stupidity and cowardice. Well, there’s always an exception, such as the regime of Governor General Simón de Anda (1701-1776).  Hindí nang-iiuan. But that’s another story from another time, when our national identity was at its peak.

It’s hopeless. We are no match against China, of course. And our puppet government has no other choice but to kowtow to Uncle Sam’s every military whim and fancy. Because war is big business. At this point, all we can do is pray and blog and complain and provide some good ‘ol pep talk…

We are mere ants compared to the big boot that is Red China. But they should remember that ants bite back. And the sting lingers.

We are mere dogs chained to our U.S. neocolonial masters. But they should remember that dogs bite back. When we do, it’s usually rabid.

We can easily be defeated, there is no doubt to that. Our military might is a joke; it has become a sham ever since Ferdinand Marcos was ousted unceremoniously. But in the end, the Filipino spirit will never falter. Defiantly.

I don’t usually swear, but right now… I am REALLY angry. So fuck you both, China and US. My middle finger salutes you. Be proud.

Hope (An paglaum)

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Here is a timely poem about hope written by a Lineyte-Samarnón writer. The poem, translated into English, was published in the book LINEYTE-SAMARNON POEMS: A Collection (published by the Divine Word University Publications in Tacloban City, Leyte in 1974). It should be remember that both Leyte and Sámar Oriental were super typhoon Yolanda’s most hardest hit provinces.

HOPE
Nicolás C. Camintoy

          More bitter than bile
the life that is mine
my heart almost breaks
of hope it is almost dry.

O bitter is the life
of a poor man like me
no friend gives me a glance
not one comes near.

In the midst of my misery
a pall often comes upon my soul
my dream of deliverance
seems to sink — it quietens!

As the storm of life almost crushes
my breast
in God the Merciful I place my hope
as the tree of strong pith
the wind cannot break, nor the storm
uproot.

Please click here for the original Leyte-Samarnón original.

How to help Yolanda victims

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So you want to help the victims of super typhoon Yolanda but don’t know where to start. One easy way is to logon to a search engine and look for charitable orgnizations. Then you may donate relief goods and/or cash, or even assist in repackaging the goods themselves. Below are just some of the institutions (with their contact details) that offer immediate assistance…

*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*

ABS-CBN Foundation Sagip Kapamilya

For in-kind donations, ABS-CBN is accepting clothes, shoes, blankets in good condition, canned goods, and drinks. You may send it in ABS-CBN Foundation Sagip Kapamilya drop-off centers.

*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*

Adamson University Charity Hub

Adamson University (AdU), through the Integrated Community Extension Services (ICES), is launching the AdU Charity Hub once more to provide relief and help to those affected by super typhoon Yolanda. The Society of Saint Vincent de Paul (SSVP) and the Vincentian Family Coordinating Council (VFCC) Philippines will be collaborating with AdU in this effort. Please click here for more information.

*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*

Ateneo de Manila University Disaster Response and Management (DReAM) Team

The Ateneo de Manila University Disaster Response and Management Team (DReaM Team), in cooperation with Jesuit NGO Simbahang Lingkod Bayan (SLB) and the Department of Social Welfare and Development, organized a relief operation for the victims of  super typhoon Yolanda. DReaM Team is accepting cash donations and relief goods. Please click here for more information.

*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*

Ayala Foundation, Inc.

The foundation is appealing for help to assist the victims of Typhoon Yolanda. They are accepting cash donations:

* Click here for local credit card holders.
* Click here for US-based donors.
* Click here for A-Deals Subscribers.

Please click here for more information.

*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*

Caritas Filipinas Foundation

Caritas Filipinas Foundation is accepting cash donations through banks and online.

For donation in PhP from overseas:
Bank Name: Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI)
Branch: Intramuros
Account Name: CBCP Caritas Filipinas Foundation Inc.
Account Number: 4951-0071-08
Swift Code: BOPIPHMM

For Donation in USD or EUR from overseas:
Bank Name: Philtrust Bank
Branch: Head Office
Account Name: CBCP Caritas Filipinas Foundation Inc.
DOLLAR Account: 0034-0001716-6
EURO Account: 0035-0000008-6
Swift Code: PHTBPHMM

Please click here for more information.

*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*

Cebú Provincial Government

The provincial government of Cebú calls for volunteers to repack relief goods for Northern Cebú, Leyte and Bojol victims. For those who are interested, you may contact Evelyn Senajón at PSWDO, Ground Floor Executive Bldg., Cebú Provincial Capitol at 254-7198 and 254-8397.

*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*

Department of Social Welfare and Development

Location: NAIA Chapel Road, Pásay City (at the back of CAAP)

The Department of Social Welfare and Development accepts cash deposits through their Landbank of the Philippines account. The account numbers: Current-3122-1011-84 Savings-3124-0055-81. If you wish to volunteer in repacking relief goods, you may call 8512681 for schedule.

*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*

Gawad Kalinga — Operation Walang Iwanan: Typhoon Yolanda

Gawad Kalinga accepts cash donations only at their Philippine Peso Current Account number-3101 0977 56 BPI EDSA Greenhills and US$ Savings Account number-3104 0162 34

* BPI EDSA Greenhills. Their swift code is BOPIPHMM

Please click here for more information.

*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*

GMA Kapuso Foundation

GMA is accepting monetary and in kind donations. For relief goods, the drops off points are:

GMA Kapuso Foundation. 2nd Floor Kapuso Center, GMA Network Drive corner Sámar Streets, Dilimán, Quezon City. Call 928-4299/928-9351.

GMA Kapuso Foundation Warehouse. 366 GMA Compound Tandang Sora Avenue Brgy. Culiat, Quezon City. Call 931-7013.

Monetary donations can be deposited at any Metrobank, UCPB, PNB and Cebuana Lhuillier branch. Please click here for more information.

*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*

Jollibee Group Foundation

The Jollibee Group Foundation accepts cash or check donations to these bank accounts:

PESO ACCOUNT:
Metrobank – Cubáo Araneta Branch
Account Name: Jollibee Group Foundation
Account Number: 473-7-47301401-3

DOLLAR ACCOUNT:
BDO – Megamall Branch
Account Name: Jollibee Foundation, Inc.
Account Number: 100-661-267-008
Swift Code: BNORPHMM

For inquiries or donors who would want to advise regarding their assistance, you may call +63.2.688-7133. For your donations to be properly acknowledged, you may either fax the bank transaction slip at +63.2.688-7038 or send a scanned copy of the bank transaction slip to foundation@jollibee.com.ph with your name, address, and contact number. Please click here for more information.

*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*

McDonald’s

All McDonald’s stores nationwide are now accepting donations in kind such as bottled water, rice, ready to eat food, toiletries, beddings, clothes and medicines for affected communities in Tacloban and other nearby areas devastated by Typhoon Haiyan.

In partnership with ABS-CBN Sagip Kapamilya, Department of Social Welfare and Development and local government units, collected relief goods will be distributed to these affected areas.

For cash or check donations, customers may be advised to directly deposit to:
Account Name: Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Philippines

Citibank N.A.
8741 Citibank Bldg., Paseo de Roxas Makati City
Account No# 060-1374-005
Swift Code: CITIUS33

Account Name: Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Philippines
Bank of the Philippine Islands
CA# 3021-4107-47

*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*

Operation Blessing Philippines

The group is accepting cash donations only. The following are the details to send money.

Metrobank
Account name: OPERATION BLESSING FOUNDATION PHILS., INC.
Account number: 270-3-27050273-4

Banco de Oro (Bdo)
Account name: OPERATION BLESSING FOUNDATION PHILS., INC.
Account number: 30000-55279

Bank of the Philippine Islands (BPI)
Account name: OPERATION BLESSING FOUNDATION PHILS., INC.
Account number: 3001-0040-33

You may also send your donation in the form of check or postal money order payable to Operation Blessing through mail. Address it to Operation Blessing, P.O. Box 2572 MCPO, 1265 Makati, Philippines. Please click here for more information.

*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*

Philippine Daily Inquirer

Philippine Red Cross


You may donate to the Philippine Red Cross (PRC) through SMS by texting RED and send it to 2899 for Globe and 4143 for Smart. You can donate the following denominations: Globe: ₱5, ₱25, ₱100, ₱300, ₱500 or ₱1,000 and for Smart: ₱10, ₱25, ₱50, ₱100, ₱300, ₱500, or ₱1.000.

For cash deposits:

Banco De Oro
Peso: 00-453-0018647
Dollar: 10-453-0039482
Swift Code: BNORPHMM

Metrobank
Peso: 151-3-041631228
Dollar: 151-2-15100218-2
Swift Code: MBTCPHMM

Philippine National Bank
Peso: 3752 8350 0034
Dollar: 3752 8350 0042
Swift Code: PNBMPHMM

Unionbank of the Philippines
Peso: 1015 4000 0201
Dollar: 1315 4000 0090
Swift code: UBPHPHMM

For in-kind donation you may send it to the PRC – National Headquarters in Manila. You may also contact them to arrange donation pick-up.

*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*

United Nations Children’s Fund

The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) are accepting cash donations. The amount that you may donate from the choices are ₱1,500, ₱3, 300, and ₱5,000. Please click here for more information.

*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*

University of the Philippines

The University of the Philippines (UP) Office of the Student Regent are accepting donations in cash or kind. Their drop off point is Vinzon’s Hall, UP Dilimán, Quezon City. You may contact Alex Castro at 0917-8725396 or tweet him at @uscupdiliman, Eds 0927384-1392 and Zie 0916796-5740. Please click here for more information.

*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*F*I*L*I*P*I*N*O*e*S*C*R*I*B*B*L*E*S*

IMPORTANT NOTE: The government has been receiving some flak over the seemingly incompetent handling of the crisis, particulary the distribution of relief goods and medicine. One major complaint is that these have not been reaching their designated areas on time, if at all. To my observation, I think one major reason why the flow of relief goods is slow is because there is a severe lack of repackers. There has been a steady supply of donations all right, but not enough people to repack them, hence slowing the pace of our government’s relief efforts. This has been confirmed by Twitter user Lendl Tan-Monterola (@_lendl_) who was part of one of the repackaging teams.

To those who read this: please, please, PLEASE spend a few hours of your time to join the repackaging of relief goods. Our countrymen in the Visayas region are starving every day. Thank you so much.

Hunger thoughts on Yolanda

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I went on an errand to Calambâ last Monday to pay some bills. I accidentally brought insufficient funds, thus I wasn’t able to buy me some lunch. I was waiting for hours on a long queue while contemplating for food and drink. A smelly character beside me was munching some deep-fried peanuts! I had half a mind asking for some, even if it’s just a couple of half-burnt, half-fried salted garlic bits. It was a crazy, debilitating moment for me, some regular guy with a huge appetite (don’t let my thin frame fool you).

I started to weaken, my sight becoming a blur. I had a book with me to keep me company, but I couldn’t even read it anymore. And I must have swallowed a glassful of spit, a pathetic way to remain hydrated.

I just couldn’t wait to get home!

And then I remembered our poor brothers and sisters in the Visayas region, most of whom haven’t eaten for days on a regular basis. I just missed my lunch, but these poor souls have been missing food for days. Not just a few hours… DAYS!

So don’t you ever dare call their desperate search for food as LOOTING.

To those reading this on their comfy seats who think they have bigger problems: THINK AGAIN.

Tulfo: I saw people walking aimlessly like zombies

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Veteran journalist Ramón Tulfo’s account of his visit to Yolanda-ravaged Tacloban city has just been published a few hours ago and is worth reblogging. Manong Mon formed a medical and mercy mission to help out in the relief efforts. As a result of his stay there, he gives us a very clear description of the horrors of the aftermath of arguably the strongest typhoon in world history, as well as emotional insights from himself and his team. What he and his staff witnessed traumatized them.

Reading his account traumatized me too. Especially this scene:

I saw two children, aged between 5 and 9, separated from their parents as they were taken away to ride on a PAF C-130 plane. The parents had been barred from boarding by soldiers, as the plane was already full.

Poor little ones. My heart bleeds, especially since I couldn’t be there to personally extend my help. I just had to hug my kids after reading this. :-(

In the light of the misery and hunger going on in many parts of Visayas, I guess it’s OK if all of us seated in our comfy chairs get “traumatized” a little bit…

Photo by Danny Pata.

Tulfo: I saw people walking aimlessly like zombies.

By 

I was not prepared for the scenes of suffering that would haunt me for the rest of my life as we landed at the Tacloban City airport.

I had formed a medical and mercy mission of 12 doctors from St. Luke’s Hospital and six nonmedical people, including myself, that landed in the city three days after Supertyphoon “Yolanda” struck. One doctor had backed out so we became a 17-member mission.

From the air, the once-bustling city of more than 200,000 people looked desolate. Everything was a total mess. It was as if an atomic bomb had been dropped.

As the Philippine Airlines (PAL) plane prepared to land, I saw people walking aimlessly like zombies.

Navy Capt. Roy Vincent Trinidad, officer in charge of the airport, asked our group—the first nongovernment medical mission to set foot in Eastern Visayas after Yolanda struck—if we wanted to go to Guiuan in Eastern Sámar. The place was supposedly more devastated than Tacloban.

He offered to take us to Guiuan—three hours by car on a normal day from Tacloban—on a helicopter.

Dr. Sammy Tanzo, head of the medical side of the mission, said our group should just stay in the premises of the airport—then crawling with soldiers and police—for security reasons.

Read more: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/527527/tulfo-i-saw-people-walking-aimlessly-like-zombies#ixzz2keJCQFT0
Follow us: @inquirerdotnet on Twitter | inquirerdotnet on Facebook

November 8, 2013 will forever be etched in the annals of Philippine History, a tragic date that will never be forgotten.

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